Can You Collect Workers’ Compensation and Short-Term Disability at the Same Time?

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Workers’ compensation insurance and short-term disability (STD) insurance are very different. Workers’ compensation covers injuries that are sustained on the job or illnesses that a worker contracts because of their job. By contrast, short-term disability insurance covers injuries that happen outside the workplace. For example, if you fall at work and get a concussion, you might be out of work for 8 weeks. You can receive workers’ compensation wage loss benefits during this time because you were injured on the job. However, you can’t get STD benefits because they don’t cover on-the-job injuries. Conversely, if you were injured in a skiing accident while on vacation, then you will probably draw STD benefits because you were injured outside work. You were not injured on the job. For these reasons, the answer to the question “Can you collect workers’ comp and short-term disability at the same time?” is usually “no.” Why is My Employer Telling Me to File for Short-Term Disability? Short-term disability insurance is usually offered through an insurer as an employee benefit. Your employer probably picks the insurer and you have the option of selecting short-term disability insurance. You might pay all or part of the premiums for the STD policy. If you were injured, your employer might tell you to apply for STD benefits—even if you were injured on the job. Clearly, this is the wrong advice. Most STD policies contain provisions stating that workers’ comp is responsible for wage loss benefits when you are injured on the job. Sometimes, an employer is confused about how workers’ comp and short-term disability relate to each other, so perhaps the wrong advice was in good faith. In other situations, however, an employer wants to file for short-term disability benefits precisely so you don’t make a claim on their workers’ comp insurance policy. Often, an employer is afraid that your claim will cause the insurance premiums to increase. To keep that from happening, your employer tells you to file for STD benefits instead. This is not a legitimate request, and you should meet with an experienced workers’ compensation attorney to discuss your options. What if Short-Term Disability Pays More? Unfortunately, you can’t make a false claim to receive STD benefits, so you can’t say you were injured outside work if that is not true. Furthermore, most short-term disability policies only provide benefits for a year. The workers’ comp system, which is much larger, could potentially pay permanent wage loss benefits, depending on your injury. It is to your benefit to go through the workers’ compensation system if you were injured on the job. Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Attorneys If you have been injured, you are probably worried about how you will replace your lost income. Contact Arechigo & Stokka today. Our firm has helped many workers receive the benefits they need after a terrible workplace accident. We can guide you through the workers’ compensation process and handle any appeal. Contact us today to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

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What is Domestic Assault Felony?

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What is Domestic Assault Felony? Domestic assault in Minnesota can be either a misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, or a felony. Felonies are much more serious charges, which usually result in greater fines and more time in jail or prison. Also, felons can lose their civil rights, such as the right to vote or possess a firearm. If you have been accused of any crime of domestic violence, please contact us today. We have extensive experience with felony domestic assault in Minnesota and can help defend you. What Is Felony Domestic Assault in Minnesota? Felony domestic assault is an aggravated version of misdemeanor domestic assault, so let’s start there. Misdemeanor domestic assault under is defined under Section 609.2242 as doing the following to a member of the family or household: Acting with the intent to cause another person to fear death or immediate bodily harm Intentionally inflicting or attempting to inflict bodily harm Members of family or household includes: Parents Children Spouses Former spouses Any blood relative Someone currently residing with the defendant or someone who has resided in the past Romantic or sexual partner Person the defendant is pregnant with or has already had a child with If this is a defendant’s first offense, then he or she will be charged with misdemeanor domestic assault. The charges get kicked up to a felony if this is the third or subsequent “qualified domestic violence-related offense” within a 10-year period. At that point, the defendant can be charged with a felony. You can also be charged with domestic felony assault if you strangled a person, even if this is your first domestic violence-related offense. What Counts as a Prior Qualified Domestic Violence-Related Offense? This is a broad category and includes the following: Violation of certain protective or restraining orders Murder (first or second degree) Assault Misdemeanor domestic violence assault Malicious punishment of a child Sending private sexual images without consent Female genital mutilation Terroristic threats or stalking Interference of emergency call Also, convictions of similar type offenses in other states will count. Two or more of any of these offenses in a 10-year period means you can be charged with domestic felony assault for your third offense. Punishment for Felony Domestic Assault in Minnesota A convicted felon faces the following punishments: Up to 5 years in state prison A fine of up to $10,000 Both Felons in Minnesota can also lose important civil rights. As an example, a felon cannot vote in Minnesota until he or she has completed their probation or prison sentence/parole. You will also lose your ability to lawfully possess a firearm and will be burdened with the stigma of a convicted felon. Contact Us Today If you have been accused of domestic felony assault, you need a passionate criminal defense attorney by your side. Contact Arechigo & Stokka today. We have helped many people accused obtain a favorable resolution, and we are anxious to help you in every way we can. We offer a free, confidential consultation.

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Domestic Assault Law in Minnesota

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Minnesota takes violence between family members very seriously, and the state has laws on the books to punish those who harm or threaten those they are close to. If you have been accused or arrested for domestic assault, you are looking at serious penalties, so you will need the guidance of an experienced criminal defense attorney. At Arechigo & Stokka, our team has defended many people accused of domestic assault in Minnesota, and we can help you, too. Please reach out to a criminal defense attorney today to discuss your options. What is Domestic Assault? Domestic assault is essentially violence between family or household members and is different from assault between strangers. Minnesota’s domestic assault law is found at 609.2242, and states that domestic assault consists of: actions that cause (or were intended to cause) fear of imminent bodily harm or death intentional infliction (or attempts to inflict) bodily harm A family or household member is defined as: Spouse or former spouse Parent Children Blood relative Person who is residing in the home or with whom you have resided in the past A person you have a child with, regardless of whether you were ever married Romantic or sexual partner Man and woman if the woman is pregnant with the man’s child Under the law, a perpetrator does not have to physically touch the victim. Instead, waving a gun in the person’s face could qualify as an act “intended to cause fear.” Penalties for Domestic Assault in Minnesota Domestic assault is a misdemeanor offense that carries the following penalties: Up to 90 days in jail Fine of up to $1,000 Both A defendant can also lose their firearms if convicted. A judge will need to find that the defendant used a firearm in “any way” during the assault. If so, then the judge can order the defendant to forfeit the firearm for a specific amount of time. If the defendant has a previous domestic violence-related conviction within the past 10 years, then a subsequent conviction will be a gross misdemeanor, which carries up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $3,000. A third conviction in a 10-year period will qualify as a felony. Felonies carry punishment of up to 5 years in prison, a $10,000 fine, or both. Felons can also lose their civil rights, such as their right to vote while incarcerated or on parole. Protection Orders A family member might have gotten a protection order against you. If you violated the order at the same time as the assault, you are looking at additional penalties. For one thing, you can be immediately arrested by the police and held in jail subject to posting bond. You are also looking at a misdemeanor offense, including up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. Criminal Defense Attorneys You Can Trust A domestic assault accusation is no small matter. Smart defendants will immediately meet with an attorney to review their case. At Arechigo & Stokka, we can help you understand your obligations under a protective order, and we can fight to get your domestic assault charge dismissed. Please contact us today for a free consultation.

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Supreme Court Limits Relief of Expungements in Minnesota

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The Minnesota Supreme Court has once again restricted the relief district courts are allowed to offer individuals seeking expungements in Minnesota. On May 22, 2013, the Court issued its decision in State v. M.D.T.  The Minnesota Supreme Court has taken the position that ordering agencies outside of the court system to seal their records of convictions is not a necessary judicial function inherent in the performance of a court’s duties.   If you were convicted of a crime in Minnesota, you may still be eligible to seek an expungement of the court records, but any records of that conviction maintained by agencies outside of the court system will likely remain open to the public. The Minnesota Court of Appeals issued a decision in the same case in 2012. There, the Court of Appeals held that district courts can use their inherent authority to seal the records held by executive agencies, such as police departments and the BCA, even in cases that resulted in convictions. However, the Supreme Court limited the reach of the Court of Appeals’ decision in its M.D.T. opinion. This means expungements in Minnesota may not offer the full relief people are seeking. At this point, it is going to be difficult if you wish to expunge all records that resulted from a criminal conviction in Minnesota. This doesn’t mean you can never get an expungement of criminal records kept by agencies outside of the court system. If criminal charges were filed but later dismissed, or if you were found not guilty after a trial, then you are still entitled to an expungement of all criminal records related to the charge(s), including any records kept by outside law enforcement agencies. The expungement relief offered in State v. R.H.B. still exists despite the Court’s ruling in M.D.T.   As noted in this site’s previous post, if criminal charges were dismissed or you were acquitted after trial, you are still presumed to be entitled to an expungement of all records maintained by the courts and outside law enforcement agencies. So, while Minnesota continues to offer a fairly significant amount of expungement relief, that relief has been reeled in a bit by the Court’s latest decision in M.D.T.  The exact expungement relief available will continue to depend on the facts and circumstances of each individual case. Contact Us Contact the Minnesota expungement lawyers at Arechigo and Stokka if you would like to discuss a possible expungement of criminal records. Our Minnesota expungement attorney will review the facts of your case and determine whether you qualify for expungements in Minnesota.

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Undocumented Workers and Workers Compensation

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Many undocumented workers in Minnesota who suffer injuries at work are nervous about filing a work comp claim. They do not know whether filing a work comp claim will alert authorities to their illegal presence in the United States. Minnesota law has addressed this issue. Status as an undocumented worker does not prohibit an injured employee from receiving workers compensation benefits. MINNESOTA SUPREME COURT SAYS UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS CAN RECEIVE WORKERS COMPENSATION BENEFITS. In 2000, an employee by the name of Fernando Correa suffered a lower back injury while at work.  Correa underwent several surgeries and received wage loss benefits.  In 2001, Correa’s employer and insurer terminated the Correa’s position based on his lack of legal authority to work in the United States.  They also petitioned to discontinue his wage loss benefits. Following a work comp hearing, the workers compensation judge rejected the employer’s argument that the employee’s wage loss was due to his unauthorized status and the employee was awarded wage loss benefits. The matter was appealed to both the Minnesota Court of Appeals and the Minnesota Supreme Court.  The Minnesota Supreme Court held that as long as the employee was able to document a diligent job search, then he was entitled to workers compensation benefits even though he was an undocumented worker. The case was then sent back to the Minnesota Work Comp Court of Appeals to decide the case in light of the decision from the Minnesota Supreme Court. The issue became whether undocumented workers can conduct diligent job searches under Minnesota workers compensation law to trigger receiving work comp benefits.  Correa’s employer argued that there is a fundamental and insurmountable problem in providing appropriate rehabilitation and job search assistance to undocumented workers, and further argued that it is a federal crime under the Immigration Reform Control Act for an individual to recruit or refer an undocumented worker for employment. The Minnesota Work Comp Court of Appeals held that the employee’s undocumented status does not by itself prohibit him from receiving workers compensation benefits.  The Court of Appeals held that a workers compensation judge, in determining the eligibility of workers compensation benefits for undocumented workers, must conduct an analysis of the employee’s physical condition, level of permanent partial disability, age, training, experience, and the type of work available in the community. In summary, an injured employee’s status as an undocumented worker does not, by itself, prohibit receiving workers compensation benefits. However, status as an undocumented worker is a factor a judge can consider as it pertains to wage loss benefits because it could impact the ability to conduct a diligent job search. HIRE FARMINGTON MINNESOTA’S BEST WORKERS COMP ATTORNEYS If you are an undocumented worker and have suffered a work injury and have reservations about filing a claim, please contact our office for a free consultation

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Minnesota Passes New Revenge Porn Law

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As expected, Minnesota has passed a new revenge porn law. Minnesota will become the 33rd state to criminalize revenge porn. Lawmakers began debating a revenge porn law ever since the Court of Appeals declared Minnesota’s former criminal defamation law unconstitutional in our Turner case.  Lawmakers formed a revenge porn working group designed to gain input into what the new revenge porn law should look like.  Attorney John Arechigo was a member of the working group.  The new law takes effect August 1, 2016. NONCONSENSUAL DISSEMINATION OF PRIVATE SEXUAL IMAGES Minnesota’s new revenge porn law has been titled Nonconsensual Dissemination of Private Sexual Images. The law punishes anyone who intentionally disseminates a private sexual image of another. The law does not require the person disseminating the photo to actually know the other person did not consent to the dissemination. Rather, it’s enough if the circumstances show the person should have known the subject of the photo did not consent to the dissemination.   The law also does not require that the state prove the actor actually knew the subject had an expectation that the photo would remain private. The law makes a first-time offense without any aggravating circumstances a Gross Misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES The act of disseminating private sexual images is treated as a felony punishable by up to three years in prison if there is sufficient proof of any of the following circumstances: the subject of the image suffered financial loss due to the dissemination the actor disseminated the image with an intent to profit off of the dissemination the actor maintained a website for the purpose of disseminating these types of images the actor posted the image on a website the actor disseminated the image with an intent to harass the subject the actor obtained the image through computer hacking the actor had previously been convicted of this offense. NEGLIGENCE VS. SPECIFIC INTENT The biggest question surrounding the new Minnesota revenge porn law is what’s referred to as the legal standard for punishment.  The nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images law punishes actors under a negligence standard in that it does not require proof that the actor acted with any sort of intent to harm the subject or intent to cause some level of emotional distress in disseminating the photos.  The law punishes the act of disseminating the images, regardless of the actor’s intent. Criminal laws typically require two elements before criminalizing conduct – the act itself and a level of criminal intent to commit the crime. Criminal laws typically do not punish innocent conduct, that is, conduct that may be a crime but the circumstances show the person did not act with the necessary level of intent to commit the crime.   This is essentially negligence. We usually do not criminalize negligence because there is not a sufficient level of criminal intent to actually commit the underlying criminal offense. Let’s use Theft as an example.  Theft requires proof that a person had property of another without the property owner’s permission and also had an intent to permanently deprive the owner of possession of the property. If the person possessing the property didn’t actually know they had the property, for example, then there clearly is no intent to permanently deprive the property owner of possession.  There is no guilty mind to punish. Minnesota’s new revenge porn law criminalizes negligence.  It does not require proof that the actor disseminated the images with any sort of underlying criminal intent.  This may very well turn out to be a fatal flaw in the law exposing it to a constitutional challenge. The new law also arguably encroaches on areas of free speech protected by the First Amendment.  Activists argue the law punishes conduct – the act of disseminating – and, therefore, does not encroach of free speech issues.  They argue the new revenge porn law essentially punishes conduct invading one’s privacy.  However, it is well established that distribution of photos, video, recordings, and other forms of media falls under the first amendment’s protection.   Expressive conduct – that is, behavior that combines some sort of conduct with a level of speech – can be protected by the first amendment.  Laws that punish the content of speech walk a fine line in terms of their constitutionality.  It will be interesting to find out how Minnesota courts will view the new revenge porn law.   Courts may very well find that the new law punishes speech.  If that is indeed the finding reached by a court, the state may have a hard time arguing the law is constitutional. EXPERIENCED MINNESOTA CRIMINAL DEFENSE LAWYERS Minnesota’s non-consensual dissemination of private sexual images is a new law.  It will take time for the courts to adapt and get a handle on the law.  We previously successfully challenged the constitutionality of the prior law punishing revenge porn.  The new law may have a number of constitutional shortcomings, as well.  Working with the legislative working group gives us the inside knowledge needed to challenge this law. CONTACT US If you are facing a charge under the new revenge porn law, please contact us to schedule a free consultation.

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Workplace Injuries

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One of the key ideas behind workers’ comp laws is that the employer provides a benefit to an employee that covers any on-the-job injury, regardless of what that injury may be and without having to determine who was at fault. The fact is that there are real limits behind the type of injury and even how the injury occurred. Such an exclusion occurs when an employee is injured while engaging in an illegal activity or if the injury was self-inflected. If the injury occurred while the employee was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, then they will not be covered. An employee may also not be covered if they were engaging in a restricted activity. However, there are many injuries that are covered by workplace accidents and they can happen on or off the employer’s property. If you have been injured on the job, you may be entitled to workers’ comp benefits to help you pay your living expenses, as well as provide you with the medical care and vocational services that you need. OBTAINING COMPENSATION FOR YOUR WORKPLACE INJURY A work-related injury doesn’t need to occur on the employer’s property. If an employee is at another facility, traveling on the job, working off-site, in an automobile during a work-related activity, or doing anything that is considered related to their job, then the injury can be classified as work-related. Even if an illness doesn’t show up for years, it may still be considered compensable. This can include respiratory issues, mesothelioma, or cancer. Illnesses that include the flu, a headache that is believed to be the result of something on the job, or complications from a mosquito bite are examples of illnesses that are not considered compensable through workers’ comp. Mental illnesses may also be covered if they are the result of an event that occurred on the job. There is a great deal of scrutiny when it comes to these cases. However, what is not compensable are emotional injuries that occur from something such as defamation or discrimination. PROTECTING YOUR RIGHTS When you do decide to file a workers’ comp claim, what an employer can’t do is retaliate against you for filing a workers’ comp claim in the way of firing or demotion. If a claim is denied due to bad faith, then your Minnesota work comp attorney will get to the bottom of the matter as soon as possible and be able to get results for you. Throughout the entire process, your rights will be protected, your interests will come first, and everything will be done for you to receive the benefits that you deserve. CONTACT A ST. PAUL WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAWYER Workplace injuries can be devastating. You go to work as usual and expect to come home as usual. Instead, something happens that results in a serious injury. From there, medical care is needed and so is financial support in order to pay for living expenses. If you need to file your claim, the help of a workers’ comp attorney will improve the accuracy of the claim. If you have been denied, then you can appeal that denial. To learn more about your workers’ comp filing options, contact Arechigo & Stokka at 651-222-6603 to schedule a free consultation.

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Can You Go to Jail for Accidentally Killing Someone with Your Car?

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Yes, it is possible. Minnesota has a criminal vehicular homicide statute that criminalizes the accidental killing of someone in a grossly negligent manner or while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. This statute does not cover every accidental killing but will certainly apply to someone who was drunk or high or who was severely negligent. Penalties are very severe, as you would expect when someone dies. Atour firm, we defend these cases aggressively, but it is important that you understand the details of the law. Minnesota’s Vehicular Homicide Law You can find the statute atSection 609.2112. It defines criminal vehicular homicide as killing someone while operating a motor vehicle when one of the following aggravating factors applies: You operated the vehicle with gross negligence You operated the vehicle negligently while under the influence of drugs or a controlled substance You had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 or higher You left the scene of an accident that you caused Your accident was caused by a defect in the vehicle and a peace officer had previously issued a citation or warning for defective maintenance These are basically the 5 bases that warrant a criminal vehicular homicide charge. Let’s look at some of them more closely. Gross Negligence Gross negligence is more serious than simple carelessness. For example, anyone could forget to check their rearview mirrors before backing up in a parking lot, which causes them to accidentally run someone over. This type of mistake, though, probably doesn’t qualify as gross negligence. Instead, gross negligence requires more blameworthy conduct. Generally, any action that a driver should know would cause a high risk of injury would qualify, such as running someone off the road by following too closely or dangerously trying to pass someone who is in a crosswalk. Impairment by Drugs or Alcohol There are several ways to qualify as sufficiently impaired. First, if you blow too high a number on a breathalyzer, then you are impaired for purposes of this statute. However, you can also qualify as impaired even if your BAC is under 0.08. The law covers situations where motorists operate a vehicle “negligently” while having some drugs or alcohol in their system. So, if you accidentally back up over someone after ingesting cocaine or heroin or drinking a beer, you could be charged with vehicular homicide. Leaving the Scene of an Accident If you caused an accident, you need to stop and render reasonable assistance. If you fail to, and the victim dies, you can be charged with criminal vehicular homicide. Can You Go to Jail for Accidentally Killing Someone in a Car Accident? Yes. In fact, you face a presumption of going to prison for 48 months if you are convicted of criminal vehicular homicide. If you are convicted of criminal vehicular homicide, you can face the following additional penalties: Up to 10 years in prison A fine up to $20,000 Both If you have a recent qualifying driving offense, the maximum imprisonment could be 15 years. Of course, not everyone convicted ends up in jail. A lot will depend on your criminal history. An aggressive criminal defense attorney can present your case to a judge in a way that helps get the most lenient sentence possible. Avoid Delay – Contact Us Arechigo & Stokka is a leading Minnesota criminal defense law firm that has tackled vehicular homicide cases. We will fight to get the most favorable resolution to your case, whether that is a dismissal, plea deal, or acquittal at trial. Contact ustoday to find out more. You can schedule a free consultation with one of our attorneys.

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Drug & Narcotics

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Twin Cities Defense Lawyers Handling Drug & Narcotic Charges in Minnesota and North Dakota Being arrested for drug crimes in Minnesota can land you in a difficult spot. If you’re convicted, you could face hefty fines, extensive prison time, and other penalties including forfeiture of vehicles, cash, or other personal property. Plus, the lasting effect of a public drug crime conviction are consequences that could affect your life long after you’ve served your sentence. The best way to avoid these implications is to mount a solid strategy to defend your interests, which starts with retaining a drug attorney in MN who focuses on these types of cases. Our lawyers at Arechigo & Stokka, P.A. have successfully helped a number of clients facing serious drug charges avoid severe penalties. Our drug crime lawyers have kept clients out of prison & have successfully fought to recover clients’ vehicles & cash.  You should always remember how criminal cases work: you’re innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, and there are defenses to drug charges. We can explore legal options after reviewing the details of your case, so please contact our St. Paul, MN office to schedule a free consultation with an experienced Minnesota drug attorney. You can also read on for some important information about these criminal proceedings. Types of Drug Crimes To understand how drug offenses work in Minnesota, you should realize the forms of conduct that are prohibited by drug laws. Under the statute on drugs and controlled substances, there are three types of acts that could lead to an arrest, including: Possession: This offense refers to having a controlled substance on your person, or otherwise within your control. Possession could be through a pocket, on your person, in parts of your vehicle, and in your home. In addition, you could be arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia, including pipes, baggies, bongs, vape pens, and other items used to consume controlled substances. Manufacturing: Any act related to producing controlled substances is prohibited. This may include manufacturing, growing plants, storage, weighing, packaging, and any other conduct that relates to the manufacturing process. Trafficking: This type of drug offense pertains to business transactions surrounding the transfer of controlled substances to other individuals. Buying, selling, transporting, and related acts are prohibited, regardless of whether you were exchange money or some other item of value. From these descriptions, you can see that all three forms of drug crimes are defined very broadly under Minnesota law. Plus, there may be some overlap among them, potentially leading to more serious charges or multiple counts. Due to these complications, having skilled legal representation is critical to defending the charges. Different Degrees of Drug Charges in Minnesota Beyond the forms of conduct that’s prohibited by state law, there are also different degrees of offenses. The severity of the charges depends upon the type of drug and the amount. Minnesota uses a schedule of controlled substances, separating different drugs into five categories according to their accepted medical usage, risk of leading to addiction, and other factors. In general, the degree of the crime is a product of: Its listing on the Schedule of Controlled Substances ranging from I to V, with I as the most dangerous; The amount of the drug, by weight; and, What you were doing with the controlled substance, i.e., possessing, manufacturing, or trafficking. Specifically, the five degrees of drug charges in Minnesota are: Fifth Degree: Though it’s the least serious offense, you could still face up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted for Fifth Degree drug crimes. This category includes possession of any amount of drugs on Schedule I through IV. Fourth Degree: A conviction for this offense classification could include incarceration up to 15 years, plus a maximum fine of $100,000. Sales and possession with intent to sell both fall in this category. Third Degree: The penalties increase to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $250,000 for an offense in the Third Degree. These crimes typically involve higher amounts of Schedule I and II drugs. Second Degree: If convicted, you face up to 25 years incarceration and a $500,000 fine. Many of these offenses are based upon where the sales transaction took place, such as a school, park, or public housing zone. First Degree: You could be charged with this highest degree of criminal drug activity for larger amounts of the most dangerous drugs. For a conviction, a judge may sentence up to 30 years in prison, plus a $1 million fine. Do’s and Don’ts After an Arrest for Drug Crimes in Minnesota In the chaos of an arrest, you’ll have many questions about what to do and not do to protect yourself. The first task is to retain an attorney for drug charges, so request to speak with your lawyer right away. In addition, a few tips in the immediate aftermath of an arrest include: Do Exercise Your Right to Remain Silent: It’s critical that you avoid making any statements to arresting officers, even if you just want to express your innocence. Anything you say could harm your case, so exercise this very important constitutional right. Don’t Resist or Fight Police: Never try to avoid an arrest by interfering with officers’ efforts. Save this fight for later, in court, with your attorney. You could face additional charges if you resist or cause bodily harm. Do Refuse a Search of Your Home: If police arrive at your home or business to charge you, step outside the door and allow them to make the arrest. Never consent to a warrantless search, which could turn up additional evidence against you. Don’t Fall for Police Interrogation Tactics: Police may use tricks to get you to talk, perhaps by promising leniency, playing “good cop-bad cop,” or other tactics. It’s also common for narcotics investigators to promise your case will go away if you simply cooperate and either “give up your sources” or participate in a controlled by.  Please know the...

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Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct

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MINNESOTA CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT LAWS COVER AN EXTREMELY BROAD AMOUNT OF BEHAVIOR. Minnesota criminal sexual conduct offenses are charged in degrees of seriousness, ranging from extremely serious felony first-degree offenses to gross misdemeanor fifth-degree offenses. The level of offense depends on the nature of the circumstances, the allegations, the amount of available evidence supporting the allegations, and the prior history – if any – of the charged individual. Were You Charged With Criminal Sexual Conduct in Minnesota? Fill out the brief the completely confidential form below so we can begin to work on your criminal sexual conduct case. Even if you were charged first, second, third, fourth or fifth-degree charges in Minnesota, John Arechigo has the experience to help work through the case with you. FIRST DEGREE CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct in the First Degree is the most severe sex crime in Minnesota.   A first degree Minnesota sex crime can be charged under any of the following circumstances: Sex or sexual contact with a person under 13 years old if the actor was more than 36 months older Sex with a person 13 to 16 years old if the actor was more than 48 months older Sex with a person under 16 years old if the actor had a significant relationship with the individual The use or threat of great bodily harm to accomplish sexual penetration The complainant suffered a personal injury during un-consenting sex This offense is most commonly charged in situations involving child molestation, child sexual abuse, and forcible rape. A mistake of age is not a defense to a charge of Criminal Sexual Conduct in the First Degree.  Criminal Sexual Conduct 1st-degree MN – Penalty: This offense carries a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison, and possibly longer if other aggravating factors exist. SECOND DEGREE CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct in the Second Degree covers all of the circumstances of a first-degree offense but does not require sexual penetration.   This sex crime punishes sexual contact under any of the circumstances of the first-degree offense.   A mistake of age is not a defense.   Criminal Sexual Conduct 2nd-degree MN – Penalty: A second-degree sex crime conviction carries a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison. THIRD DEGREE CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct in the Third Degree punishes sexual penetration under any of the following circumstances: The complainant is under 13 years old and the actor is no more than 36 months older The complainant is at least 13 years old but less than 16 years old and the actor is no more than 24 months older The complainant is at least 16 years old but less than 18 and the actor is more than 48 months older and in a position of authority The complainant is at least 16 years old but less than 18 and the actor has a significant relationship with the individual The complainant is a patient of a psychotherapist and there is an active psychotherapist-patient relationship The actor is a member of the clergy and the complainant was seeking the actor’s advice or counseling The actor knows or has reason to know that the complainant is mentally impaired, mentally incapacitated, or physically helpless Third Degree Criminal Sexual Conduct is most commonly charged in situations where people have been drinking and a person – usually female – claims that someone had sex with her when she was either passed out or unable to withhold her consent. It’s always tough to know what really happened in these circumstances.   It’s not uncommon for both parties to be intoxicated during a sexual encounter and not really remember the details of the incident. It can be frightening to find yourself charged with a sex crime for what seemed like a consensual sexual encounter. A mistake of age is a defense, but only to a charge under the second bullet point and only if the actor is no more than 120 months older than the complainant.   In this situation, the burden is on the actor to prove that the actor reasonably believed the complainant to be at least 16 years old.   A mistake of age is not a defense under any of the other circumstances.   Criminal Sexual Conduct 3rd-degree MN – Penalty: This offense carries a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. We’ve successfully defended sex crimes.  See Some Results FOURTH DEGREE CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct in the Fourth Degree covers all of the circumstances of a third-degree offense but does not require sexual penetration.  This sex crime punishes sexual contact under any of the circumstances of the third-degree offense.   The same limited defense applies.   Criminal Sexual Conduct 4th-degree MN – Penalty: This offense carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. FIFTH DEGREE CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT Minnesota Criminal Sexual Conduct in the Fifth Degree punishes non-consensual sexual contact and masturbation or lewd exhibition of genitals in the presence of a minor. A first-time offense is a gross misdemeanor offense. A felony charge will be filed if the person has a previous fifth-degree conviction. Minnesota criminal sexual conduct crimes are some of the most serious crimes in the state. Not only does a defendant face lengthy prison sentences, but registration requirements are triggered by a sex crime conviction as well. Theses cases involve complicated evidentiary rules.   The use of witness testimony, prior out-of-court statements of a complainant or defendant, and the prior sexual history of a complainant or defendant can be very difficult to navigate.   The more serious sex crimes also almost always involve complex scientific evidence, such as DNA. HIRE ONE OF THE BEST DEFENSE LAWYERS IN ST. PAUL MINNESOTA A conviction of a sex crime can have a life-altering impact.   You need a St. Paul, Minnesota criminal defense lawyer who knows how to prepare an aggressive defense.   Contact us today for a free consultation. Frequently Asked Questions Section:

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