Tips for Hiring the Best Criminal Defense Attorney in MN

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Choosing the best criminal defense attorney in Minnesota can feel overwhelming. With so many law firms to choose from, you may struggle to find the attorney that is right for you. Below are some tips for hiring the best Minnesota criminal defense attorney, so you get the legal counsel you need.  Choose an Attorney with Relevant Experience Criminal defense encompasses a broad category of different legal practices. A lawyer who specializes in one field may not have the relevant experience to provide you the best representation for your specific case. When searching for an attorney or law firm, narrow your choices based on the type of law the attorney practices and where they practice. Ask yourself the following questions: What type of case do I have? What kinds of law does the attorney practice and are they related to my case? How much experience does the attorney have practicing that type of law? Does the attorney have experience taking their cases to trial? Where does the attorney primarily practice law? What were the most recent types of cases the attorney handled? Laws vary significantly depending on each state. You should make sure your attorney has experience practicing law in Minnesota. Attorneys who specialize in Minnesota criminal law have experience and an in-depth understanding of the relevant statutes and court decisions that will apply to your case.  Choose an Attorney Who Is Responsive and Trustworthy The best criminal defense attorneys in Minnesota understand the importance of client communication and building trust. Your attorney should respond quickly and professionally and answer your questions in full. While searching for attorneys, you should reach out to the law firm with questions about their practice. The firm’s responsiveness will tell you a lot about their client communication practices and what to expect if you hire them for your case. A good attorney also strives to create an atmosphere of trust with their clients. You should feel comfortable sharing and communicating openly with your lawyer. Attorneys that lack adequate communication skills will struggle to provide you with quality representation. Search for Attorneys with a Strong Reputation A criminal defense attorney’s reputation will provide you important insights into the quality of their legal practice. A strong professional reputation shows that the lawyer has a history of success as well as the respect of their professional peers. Look for attorneys who receive special recognition from legal professional organizations. You can search an attorney’s professional reputation through databases such as: Your local bar association Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings, and Lawyers.com. You can also search the law firm’s website and check if the firm’s lawyers have received any special recognition, such as a SuperLawyers designation, Attorney of the Year, or other public recognition. In addition to professional reputation, previous client reviews can tell you a lot about an attorney and their legal practice. Most law firm websites contain a section of testimonials from previous clients. Review these and compare them to external review sources, such as Google and Avvo and other customer review websites. Finally, one of the best ways to find a quality lawyer is through word-of-mouth referrals. A recommendation from someone you know and trust can give you confidence that the attorney will give you high-quality legal advice to guide you through each step of the legal process.  Search for Attorneys with a History of Success Reputation and experience are important to your search, but those factors alone may not tell you whether the attorney can achieve a successful outcome. Search for attorneys with a proven history of success. Most law firms will have a section on their website listing their previous successes. While searching, ask yourself the following questions: What was the attorney’s most recent case? What was the type of case? What was the outcome? During an initial consultation, you can also ask your prospective attorney how often they settle a case or go to trial.  Choose an Attorney with a Fair Cost Structure All private attorneys will charge fees for their legal services. However, firms may utilize different fee structures to charge their clients. Most criminal defense attorneys will charge a flat fee to handle your case. Under this fee structure, the attorney will charge a specific amount upfront depending on the nature of the case. When assessing fee structures, ask the following questions: What type of fee structure do you use? How much do you charge? If I’m paying a flat rate, what legal services does the fee cover? Do you offer payment plans? Legal fees can get expensive. Before hiring an attorney, make sure you understand and are comfortable with their fees and fee structure.  Meet with Your Top Choices and Take Notes Once you narrow down your choices, schedule an initial consultation with your top three attorneys.  Come prepared with a list of questions and information about your case. Make sure you take good notes so you can compare each law firm. You can learn a lot about your prospective lawyer through the initial consultation. Try to gauge their personality and demeanor, and make sure they are someone with whom you want to work.  Contact a Qualified Minnesota Criminal Defense Attorney Today If you face criminal charges in Minnesota, the lawyers at Arechigo & Stokka are ready to help. Our attorneys have combined decades of experience handling Minnesota criminal defense cases. We care deeply about our clients and always put their interests first. Our committed staff will answer your questions and assist you every step of the way. For a free consultation, call our office at 651-362-4551 or fill out an online form today. 

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Criminal Vehicular Manslaughter in Minnesota | How We Can Help

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Most of us rely on our automobiles and use them every day. But driving a car is also dangerous and sometimes can result in serious injury or death. In certain circumstances, a driver whose actions result in another’s death may face criminal charges, even if the person’s death was unintentional. Criminal vehicular homicide or manslaughter is a very serious offense, and a person convicted of such a crime faces the very real prospect of going to prison. If you or someone you know is facing criminal vehicular homicide charges, contact a qualified Minnesota criminal defense attorney right away.  What Is Criminal Vehicular Manslaughter? Under Minnesota law, criminal vehicular manslaughter occurs when a person operates a vehicle in a criminally unsafe manner. A person may face criminal vehicular homicide charges when they: Operate a vehicle in a grossly negligent manner; Drive negligently while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or a combination of both; Drive negligently while under the influence of another substance they should know can cause impairment; or Leave the scene of an accident they caused. A driver may also face charges if he or she had previously received a ticket for a defective vehicle and the defect caused the other person’s death. Penalties for Criminal Vehicular Homicide in Minnesota  Criminal vehicular homicide is a felony offense in Minnesota.  Criminal penalties include: A prison sentence of up to ten years, A fine of up to $20,000, or A combination of fines and prison. In addition, if you commit criminal vehicular manslaughter while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and the offense occurs within ten years of a prior driving offense, you may face up to fifteen years in prison. Besides criminal sentences, felonies can affect you in several ways long after you complete your prison term and pay your fines. If convicted of a felony, you may suffer other consequences, including: Difficulty finding a job, Trouble finding and qualifying for housing, and Problems obtaining student loans for education expenses. If you are facing criminal vehicular manslaughter charges, it is important to speak with an experienced Minnesota criminal defense attorney. Your attorney understands the law and can help you navigate the legal process and develop a strong legal defense. Defenses to Criminal Vehicular Manslaughter Our criminal vehicular manslaughter defense attorney can help you determine which defenses apply to your case. The prosecution bears the burden of proving your guilt. This means a prosecutor must present sufficient evidence to prove each element of the offense. An experienced lawyer will challenge the sufficiency or the accuracy of the evidence. For example, your attorney may argue that  you were not sufficiently intoxicated during the accident, that your actions were not negligent or did not cause the crash, or that you were not driving the car. Other defenses to criminal vehicular manslaughter may include involuntary intoxication. Minnesota law also specifically states that a person will not face criminal vehicular manslaughter charges if they have a controlled substance in their bodies but used the substance according to the directions on a prescription. How Can a Lawyer Help? Criminal vehicular manslaughter charges are very serious. Establishing a legal defense can be a complex and confusing process. A skilled criminal defense attorney understands the law, court procedures, and how to use available facts to create a strong defense. Your attorney will manage your case and take the pressure off you. Your attorney will: Perform a thorough factual investigation, Gather witness statements, Collect police reports and medical documents, Negotiate with the prosecuting attorney, Research and analyze the relevant laws, and Represent you in court and present a compelling defense at trial. Contact a Minnesota Criminal Defense Attorney Today The experienced lawyers at Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., provide top-quality legal representation to our clients throughout Minnesota. We know that facing criminal charges is a scary and life-changing event. We care deeply about our clients and fight tirelessly to defend their interests. We provide hands-on, personalized legal services. Our dedicated team will thoroughly analyze your claim and assist you every step of the way. For a free consultation, call our offices at 651-222-6603 or fill out an online form today. 

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Minnesota Fourth Degree DWI Penalties

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4th DEGREE DWI | FOURTH DEGREE DUI If you are facing a Fourth Degree DWI charge, it is unlikely that you will have to go to jail if convicted.   A Fourth Degree DUI charge in St. Paul, Minnesota typically results when it is the person’s first ever DWI or the first DWI charge within the last ten years and the driver’s blood alcohol content is below .20.   A Fourth Degree DWI charge also means that there are no other aggravating factors present, such as a test refusal or a child in the car at the time of driving. A Fourth Degree DWI is a misdemeanor criminal offense.  Misdemeanors are the lowest level of crimes in Minnesota, but they are still a crime.   This means you would have to answer “yes” to any application questions asking if you have ever been convicted of a crime. Are There Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Requirements? There are no mandatory minimum sentencing requirements if you are convicted or otherwise found guilty of a Minnesota fourth degree DWI. This does not mean that you will absolutely not have to spend any time in jail for a Fourth Degree DWI conviction, it just means that jail time is not mandatory.   Depending on which Minnesota County the offense occurred in, a 4th Degree DWI conviction will likely carry 1-2 years of probation and a $300-500 fine.   Additional court costs and court service fees may also kick in.  You will also be required to complete a chemical dependency evaluation and follow any recommendations for substance abuse treatment.   You may also be required to attend a Mother’s Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Victim Impact Panel. Charged With a 4th Degree DUI? We Can Help If you were recently charged with a 4th degree DUI in MN we can help you with the charges. Fill out the free and confidential form below so we can review the details of your case. Will I Lose My License if Charged With a 4th Degree DWI in MN? In addition to the criminal consequences triggered by a Minnesota fourth-degree DWI conviction, you will also face a loss of your driver’s license. A driver’s license is revoked for 90 days upon the initial charge of 4th Degree DWI if your blood alcohol content was .08 to .15.   The 90 day revocation period is reduced to 30 days upon pleading guilty to the 4th Degree DWI charge only if it is a true first time DWI offense.   You will then have to comply with the reinstatement requirements before your driver’s license will be valid.   The revocation period is extended to 1 year if your blood alcohol content was .16 to .19 and you will also face a loss of your license plates for 1 year. Contact a Saint Paul, MN DUI/DWI Attorney Contact our Minneapolis / St. Paul DWI lawyers today if you or someone you know is facing a Fourth Degree DWI in MN. Our St. Paul DWI attorneys will thoroughly review your case and do everything we can to get your driver’s license back and help you avoid a DWI conviction. Frequently Asked Questions

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Is Wax a Felony in Minnesota?

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Possessing marijuana wax in any amount qualifies you for felony charges in Minnesota.  You will also face felony charges if you distribute or sell wax (also known as “dabs”), THC oil, or other alternative forms of marijuana. If you are convicted, you will face substantial penalties that can seriously affect your life. Fortunately, a Minnesota drug possession lawyer can help you by building a strong case for your defense. What Are the Penalties for Wax Possession? Any offense involving the possession of marijuana in resin or hash oil form – including wax – can result in felony charges. Although possessing the plant form of marijuana in small quantities carries only petty misdemeanor charges, even the smallest amount of wax can send you to prison for years. The level of felony charges you face for possessing wax will depend on the quantity in question, your prior criminal history, and the circumstances of your arrest.  Even the least of the potential felony charges carries the threat of five years in prison and fines up to $10,000. For larger quantities, you could face up to 30 years behind bars and as much as $1,000,000 in fines. If you have prior convictions on your record, you can expect to face the maximum penalties. What Are the Penalties for Distributing Wax? Selling or distributing wax and other non-plant forms of marijuana carries even harsher penalties, especially when larger quantities are involved. The maximum penalty could lead to 35 years in prison and a fine of $1,250,000.  Any quantity sold to a minor or distributed in a school zone can lead to 15 to 20 years in prison and fines that range up to $250,000. Costs & Consequences of a Wax-Related Crime Upon conviction for a wax-related felony, you also face a variety of consequences in addition to fines and potential prison time. You will have a permanent criminal record, which can prevent you from getting a job, getting into a good school, holding a professional license, and more. You could lose your driver’s license, and in some cases, the state could even seize your property and assets, depending on the circumstances of your case. How Does Medical Marijuana Affect Wax? If you are medically qualified for marijuana use, you can legally possess small quantities of wax. To avoid facing misdemeanor or felony wax charges, you must be duly enrolled and in compliance with the applicable medical marijuana regulations. Potential Defenses Against Wax Charges Fortunately, drug crimes lawyers have many options when building a defense to felony wax charges. For example, an illegal search and seizure can render evidence inadmissible in court. Likewise, if the police fail to properly handle the evidence, it may also become inadmissible. Another effective defense strategy involves the location in which the police found the wax. If you did not have physical control of the substance (such as in a pocket or purse), your lawyer can potentially make the case that the wax wasn’t yours. If the police violated your legal rights at any time during your arrest or processing, you may also have grounds for getting your charges reduced or dismissed.   When Should You Call a Drug Crimes Lawyer? Being arrested for any drug-related crime is a serious situation. Before you make any statements or agree to any plea deal, talk to a Minnesota marijuana crimes lawyer. At Arechigo & Stokka, our criminal defense attorneys understand the seriousness of your situation. That’s why we offer a free consultation, so you can understand the charges pending against you and your potential options. Call us now for help.

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Maximum Sentence for Misdemeanor in Minnesota

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However, when speaking of possible sentences for misdemeanor criminal convictions in Minnesota, there is a broad range of possible sentences.   District courts have wide discretion in deciding which conditions to place on a person convicted of a misdemeanor in Minnesota.   THE MAXIMUM SENTENCE FOR MISDEMEANOR IN MINNESOTA IS 90 DAYS IN JAIL AND A $1,000.00 FINE These conditions can include random drug or alcohol testing, payment of restitution, and no contact with certain individuals, to name just a few. For the maximum sentence for a misdemeanor conviction in Minnesota, a court cannot impose more than a 90-day jail sentence and a $1,000 fine.   If a judge imposes the maximum sentence and orders the convicted individual to serve 90 days in jail, the judge cannot also impose conditions such as random drug or alcohol testing.   A person convicted of a misdemeanor in Minnesota has the option to execute the maximum 90-day jail sentence. If executed, the judge cannot order probation or additional conditions to be imposed after the 90 days have been served. SOME CRIMES IN MINNESOTA ARE ENHANCEABLE OFFENSES This means that the more you get, the worse the punishment gets.  DWI and Domestic Assault are probably the most common enhanceable offenses.   If a person is convicted of a first-time misdemeanor Domestic Assault offense, the maximum sentence that could be imposed is 90 days in jail.   However, if that same individual is convicted of a subsequent Domestic Assault offense within ten years of the misdemeanor conviction, that second offense will be enhanced to a gross misdemeanor and will carry increased penalties. In addition to a 90-day jail maximum sentence for a misdemeanor in Minnesota, there are additional penalties that could come into play for a conviction of certain types of offenses These additional penalties are commonly referred to as “collateral consequences.”   Again, DWI and Domestic Assault or probably the most common types of offenses that trigger collateral consequences if convicted.   For example, certain firearm restrictions are triggered by a misdemeanor domestic assault conviction in Minnesota and driver’s license revocation issues pop up if convicted of a misdemeanor DWI. If you or someone you know is facing a misdemeanor criminal charge in Minnesota, you need an experienced  Minnesota criminal defense lawyer.   Our St. Paul criminal defense attorneys will answer all of your questions about your misdemeanor charge.   Our Minnesota criminal defense attorneys will prepare a strong and effective defense that will help you avoid the maximum sentence for your misdemeanor charge.   Contact our St. Paul criminal defense lawyers today to schedule your free consultation.

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Keep Calm and Lawyer Up

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Perhaps the most important thing someone can remember to do when they find him or herself in the middle of a police encounter is to keep calm.   Getting into an argument with the police, no matter how right you may be, is not going to do any good.  The police will most likely describe you as being “uncooperative” or “combative.” Instead, keep calm and lawyer up.  Tell the officers that you would like to have your attorney present for any questioning.  After you have asserted your right to have an attorney present, the police cannot ask you anymore questions and the interrogation must end. Keep calm and lawyer up.

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How Long Can the Police Detain You?

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MOST PEOPLE WONDER HOW LONG CAN POLICE DETAIN YOU OR YOUR VEHICLE DURING A TRAFFIC STOP. The duration of the vehicle stop depends on the initial reason for the traffic stop and any other criminal suspicion that develops after the stop.   The Minnesota Supreme Court states that the duration of the vehicle stop must be temporary and cannot last any longer than is necessary to investigate the initial reason for the traffic stop.  However, there is no concrete time limit for a lawful length of a traffic stop. The police need to suspect other criminal activity separate from the reason for the initial traffic stop before they can continue to lawfully detain the vehicle beyond the time it would have taken to write a traffic citation.   Examples for Determining How Long Minnesota Police Can Detain You In determining how long can police detain you for failing to use a blinker while turning, the officer cannot approach the vehicle and ask the driver if there are drugs in the car.  That would be an unlawful expansion of the reason for the traffic stop.  The officer stopped the vehicle for not using a blinker, not because he suspected there were drugs in the car.  Before the officer can expand the duration of the traffic stop, he would need reason to believe there were drugs in the car.   If the officer thought he smelled marijuana in the vehicle then he could question the driver about having drugs.  In this situation, the officer could detain the driver as long as the officer acted to confirm his suspicions of drugs in the car.  How long police can detain you or your vehicle increases with each additional suspicion of criminal activity. THERE IS NO HARD-AND-FAST TIME LIMIT FOR A LAWFUL TRAFFIC STOP. The duration of the traffic stop will depend on the facts and circumstances surrounding each individual traffic stop situation.  In one case, the Minnesota Supreme Court held a 61 minute traffic stop to be lawful under the circumstances. If you find yourself in the middle of a traffic stop, it is important to remember that you DO NOT have to answer any of the officer’s questions.  You have the absolute right to remain silent.  In most cases, it is in your best interests not to answer any questions.  Instead, simply tell the officer that you are not going to answer any questions without your Minnesota criminal defense lawyer present.   After that, call the St. Paul criminal defense lawyers at Arechigo & Stokka.  Our Minnesota criminal defense lawyers will advise you how to handle the situation and tell you what to say, if anything.  If you find yourself arrested or facing criminal charges following your traffic stop, our St. Paul criminal defense lawyers will investigate the reasons behind the initial traffic stop and the officer’s reasons for expanding the length of the stop.  If the officer unlawfully expanded the duration of your traffic stop, our St. Paul criminal defense lawyers will fight to have the evidence suppressed. Contact our Minnesota criminal defense lawyers today if you or someone you know recently faced an expanded traffic stop.

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Can Police Force You to Unlock Your Phone?

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Can Police Make You Use Your Fingerprint to Unlock Your Phone? Many newer smartphones allow owners to unlock their phone with the touch of their fingerprint. Smartphone manufacturers market the fingerprint lock as an advancement in security.  I would probably bet that a good number of people do not set a passcode lock on their phone because it’s annoying to have to enter a passcode to check your phone every ten minutes.  But, many more people probably would – and do – set up the fingerprint lock feature on their phone.  So, what’s the difference between a fingerprint and a passcode?  Well, when it comes to compelled police searches of your phone, the difference is enormous. Police Can Force You to Use Your Fingerprint to Unlock Your Phone Police can force iPhone – or any other smartphone equipped with fingerprint technology – users to unlock their iPhone if the iPhone is only secured by fingerprint security.  As long as the police have obtained a valid search warrant, they can command an iPhone owner to put her finger on the button and unlock the phone. Police Cannot Force You to Divulge Your Passcode to Unlock Your Phone If your iPhone is protected by a passcode, then the police cannot compel you to disclose the passcode for purposes of forcing you to unlock your phone.  It does not matter if they have secured a search warrant.  A search warrant cannot compel an iPhone owner to disclose the phone’s passcode.  The Fifth Amendment protects us from being forced by the government to provide evidence against ourselves.  This is the right against self-incrimination. Why the Legal Distinction Between A Fingerprint And A Passcode? Courts have drawn a legal line separating a fingerprint from a passcode.  Fingerprints are viewed as who we are rather than what we know.  A passcode is data stored in the brain, something we know.  Fingerprints, on the other hand (sorry, couldn’t resist), are much more accessible and make up our “biometric data.” This is a key distinction for purposes of compelled police searches.  Providing a passcode requires giving an oral statement to the police that potentially incriminates an individual.  Courts refer to this as a “testimonial statement.”  The Fifth Amendment gives us the right to remain silent and prevents the government from compelling a testimonial statement. Fingerprints are classified with DNA samples or voice samples.  This is not viewed as evidence you know; so, forcing you to put your finger on your iPhone is not the same as compelling a testimonial statement.  You’re not being forced to say something you know that potentially incriminates yourself. Moral of the story?  If you know you’re keeping potentially incriminating or unlawful information on your iPhone, best to lock it up with a passcode instead of a fingerprint. Schedule a Consultation With a Criminal Defense Lawyer Contact our criminal defense lawyers today for a free consultation.   Our criminal defense lawyers are licensed in Minnesota, North Dakota, and United States District Court.   If the police have unlawfully recovered evidence against you by illegally searching your iPhone, our criminal defense lawyers will fight to have the evidence suppressed.

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What is Domestic Assault Felony?

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What is Domestic Assault Felony? Domestic assault in Minnesota can be either a misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, or a felony. Felonies are much more serious charges, which usually result in greater fines and more time in jail or prison. Also, felons can lose their civil rights, such as the right to vote or possess a firearm. If you have been accused of any crime of domestic violence, please contact us today. We have extensive experience with felony domestic assault in Minnesota and can help defend you. What Is Felony Domestic Assault in Minnesota? Felony domestic assault is an aggravated version of misdemeanor domestic assault, so let’s start there. Misdemeanor domestic assault under is defined under Section 609.2242 as doing the following to a member of the family or household: Acting with the intent to cause another person to fear death or immediate bodily harm Intentionally inflicting or attempting to inflict bodily harm Members of family or household includes: Parents Children Spouses Former spouses Any blood relative Someone currently residing with the defendant or someone who has resided in the past Romantic or sexual partner Person the defendant is pregnant with or has already had a child with If this is a defendant’s first offense, then he or she will be charged with misdemeanor domestic assault. The charges get kicked up to a felony if this is the third or subsequent “qualified domestic violence-related offense” within a 10-year period. At that point, the defendant can be charged with a felony. You can also be charged with domestic felony assault if you strangled a person, even if this is your first domestic violence-related offense. What Counts as a Prior Qualified Domestic Violence-Related Offense? This is a broad category and includes the following: Violation of certain protective or restraining orders Murder (first or second degree) Assault Misdemeanor domestic violence assault Malicious punishment of a child Sending private sexual images without consent Female genital mutilation Terroristic threats or stalking Interference of emergency call Also, convictions of similar type offenses in other states will count. Two or more of any of these offenses in a 10-year period means you can be charged with domestic felony assault for your third offense. Punishment for Felony Domestic Assault in Minnesota A convicted felon faces the following punishments: Up to 5 years in state prison A fine of up to $10,000 Both Felons in Minnesota can also lose important civil rights. As an example, a felon cannot vote in Minnesota until he or she has completed their probation or prison sentence/parole. You will also lose your ability to lawfully possess a firearm and will be burdened with the stigma of a convicted felon. Contact Us Today If you have been accused of domestic felony assault, you need a passionate criminal defense attorney by your side. Contact Arechigo & Stokka today. We have helped many people accused obtain a favorable resolution, and we are anxious to help you in every way we can. We offer a free, confidential consultation.

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Domestic Assault Law in Minnesota

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Minnesota takes violence between family members very seriously, and the state has laws on the books to punish those who harm or threaten those they are close to. If you have been accused or arrested for domestic assault, you are looking at serious penalties, so you will need the guidance of an experienced criminal defense attorney. At Arechigo & Stokka, our team has defended many people accused of domestic assault in Minnesota, and we can help you, too. Please reach out to a criminal defense attorney today to discuss your options. What is Domestic Assault? Domestic assault is essentially violence between family or household members and is different from assault between strangers. Minnesota’s domestic assault law is found at 609.2242, and states that domestic assault consists of: actions that cause (or were intended to cause) fear of imminent bodily harm or death intentional infliction (or attempts to inflict) bodily harm A family or household member is defined as: Spouse or former spouse Parent Children Blood relative Person who is residing in the home or with whom you have resided in the past A person you have a child with, regardless of whether you were ever married Romantic or sexual partner Man and woman if the woman is pregnant with the man’s child Under the law, a perpetrator does not have to physically touch the victim. Instead, waving a gun in the person’s face could qualify as an act “intended to cause fear.” Penalties for Domestic Assault in Minnesota Domestic assault is a misdemeanor offense that carries the following penalties: Up to 90 days in jail Fine of up to $1,000 Both A defendant can also lose their firearms if convicted. A judge will need to find that the defendant used a firearm in “any way” during the assault. If so, then the judge can order the defendant to forfeit the firearm for a specific amount of time. If the defendant has a previous domestic violence-related conviction within the past 10 years, then a subsequent conviction will be a gross misdemeanor, which carries up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $3,000. A third conviction in a 10-year period will qualify as a felony. Felonies carry punishment of up to 5 years in prison, a $10,000 fine, or both. Felons can also lose their civil rights, such as their right to vote while incarcerated or on parole. Protection Orders A family member might have gotten a protection order against you. If you violated the order at the same time as the assault, you are looking at additional penalties. For one thing, you can be immediately arrested by the police and held in jail subject to posting bond. You are also looking at a misdemeanor offense, including up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. Criminal Defense Attorneys You Can Trust A domestic assault accusation is no small matter. Smart defendants will immediately meet with an attorney to review their case. At Arechigo & Stokka, we can help you understand your obligations under a protective order, and we can fight to get your domestic assault charge dismissed. Please contact us today for a free consultation.

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