Understanding Workers’ Comp Settlements for Neck Injuries

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When you suffer a neck injury at work, it can impact your entire life. You may be in pain, unable to work, and struggling to pay bills. Workers’ compensation can help you get medical treatment and pay you wages while you’re out of work.  However, some companies don’t treat you fairly when you file a workers’ compensation claim. Our lawyers fight companies who harm employees or fail to give them fair compensation. We help clients get fair workers’ comp settlements for neck injuries. The first step to getting the money you need is understanding Minnesota workers’ compensation legal requirements. How Much Does Workers’ Comp Pay? Workers’ compensation is a no-fault system, meaning that even if you were responsible for your accident, it usually pays. However, workers’ compensation provides only limited payment, depending on the classification of your injury. While it’s hard for us to give an average workers’ compensation settlement, neck injury payments are based on the extent of your disability and your average wage before the accident.  After evaluating your workplace injury, a doctor may classify you as:  Temporarily partially disabled (TPD), Temporarily totally disabled (TTD), Permanently partially disabled (PPD), or Permanently totally disabled (PTD). Each injury classification allows for different compensation amounts for varying time periods. Temporary Disability Compensation Temporary disability workers’ compensation payments include: Two-thirds of your average weekly wage up to a maximum of $1,134.24 per week; and Medical bills. Temporary total disability payments cease when: You return to work; You reach maximum medical improvement (more medical treatment won’t help); or You reach 130 weeks of benefits for a temporary total disability. If you return to work with a temporary partial disability, you may not be able to work in the same role due to your injury. If your salary is reduced in your new workplace role, you can receive temporary partial disability payments to make up two-thirds of the difference. These temporary partial disability payments cease after you get them for 250 weeks or reach 450 weeks after your injury. Permanent Partial Disability Compensation If you are permanently partially disabled, you can receive a one-time workers’ compensation neck injury settlement sum or installment payments. Permanent disability payments are calculated based on the severity of your injury, and that required compensation schedule is provided in Minnesota law. Permanent Total Disability Compensation Permanent total disability qualifies you for two-thirds of your average wage (up to a maximum) for as long as you are disabled. This amount may reduce if you receive government disability payments. Get Legal Help for Workers’ Compensation At the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka, we have been helping work accident victims for decades. We have the legal experience and courage needed to fight big businesses that harm their employees. Workers’ comp neck injury settlements can help injured workers, so we pressure employers to pay fairly.  If you need help getting workers’ compensation, contact our attorneys for a free consultation. We’ll treat you with respect and fight for your rights to fair compensation.

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Minnesota Drug Trafficking Penalties

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Drug trafficking is generally known as the most serious drug offense that carries the stiffest penalties. Drug trafficking charges refer to the weight of the drugs either sold or possessed. Although Minnesota’s drug law prohibits selling, possessing to distribute, or possession of narcotics, it does not reference a drug trafficking charge by name. But like other states and the federal government, Minnesota reserves the most severe punishments for drug crimes that involve a high weight of the narcotics.  If you or a loved one faces drug trafficking charges in Minnesota, then you need a tough, experienced, and highly skilled drug trafficking defense lawyer to represent you. A seasoned Minnesota drug trafficking attorney with decades of experience knows how to create a defense strategy that minimizes your chances of spending many years in prison. What Is Drug Trafficking in Minnesota? Minnesota categorizes its drug crimes by the weight of the narcotics. The state’s most serious drug crimes are first-degree controlled substance crimes. A person violates Minnesota’s first-degree controlled substance crime drug trafficking law by either selling more than a threshold quantity of drugs within 90 days or possessing more than a threshold amount of drugs. The various thresholds for first-degree drug crimes depend on the type of drug. Trafficking By Selling Narcotics Under this section, a person is guilty of a controlled substance crime in the first degree by selling on one or more occasions during the previous 90 days: 17 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine; 10 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm or two aggravating factors; 10 grams of more of heroin;  50 grams or more of another narcotic other than cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin; 50 grams or more, or 200 dosage units, of amphetamine, phencyclidine, or hallucinogenic drug; or 25 kilograms of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol. Minnesota law allows prosecutors to include mixtures of non-narcotics in the total amount of drugs. Trafficking By Possession A person could be convicted of a controlled substance crime in the first degree by possessing a specified quantity of certain drugs as well. A person is guilty of controlled substance crime in the first degree by possessing: 50 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine; 25 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm or two aggravating factors;  25 grams or more of heroin; 500 grams of a drug other than cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin, or 50 kilograms of marijuana or 500 marijuana plants. As with selling narcotics, the total weight includes the drugs and any other substance mixed in. How Much Jail Time for Drug Trafficking? The severity of the drug trafficking charges determines the amount of prison time a person could serve. A controlled substance crime in the first degree carries a maximum sentence of 30 years. The court could issue a fine of up to $1 million. However, the maximum penalty increases to 40 years if the accused has a previous controlled substance conviction. The law requires the person to receive at least four years in prison for a subsequent offense. The penalties increase if the state proves trafficking in the presence of aggravating factors. A person convicted of selling more than 100 grams or possessing over 500 grams of cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin must serve 65 months in prison. The minimum mandatory is 86 months if the crime involved a firearm or the presence of two aggravating factors. People Facing Tough Drug Trafficking Penalties Need a Tough Lawyer If you or a loved one is facing drug trafficking charges in Minnesota, we can help. The drug tracking defense lawyers with the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka will rely on their extensive trial experience to fight for you. Call Arechigo & Stokka today at 651-222-6603 to defend your drug trafficking charges aggressively.

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How Much Does a DUI Cost In Minnesota?

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The average cost of a DUI or DWI in Minnesota is much more expensive than one might expect. DUI fees can be staggering in Minnesota. You need to understand the potential financial impact of a DUI in Minnesota if you face DUI charges, in addition to any criminal penalties you face. A qualified Minnesota DWI defense attorney could explain all of the potential DUI fees you could pay if a court finds you guilty of DWI. The facts and circumstances of your case dictate the choices you could make. However, frankly discussing your DUI case with a seasoned and dedicated DUI attorney from Minnesota would help you make the best decision for you and your family. Average Cost of DUI No one appreciates the amount of money a DUI costs until facing DWI charges. How much does a DUI cost, can only be determined after a thorough analysis of your case. However, DUI fees begin to pile up immediately after a DUI arrest.  A person under arrest for DWI in Minnesota may need to post bond, depending on the severity of the DUI offense. A non-monetary conditional release might be appropriate for a person charged with a first-offense DUI without aggravating factors. However, you may have to post a monetary bond if you had an alcohol content double the legal limit, face a subsequent offense or caused an accident with injuries or death. State law governs bonds in Minnesota. Under Minnesota’s bond law, the bond for a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor is double the maximum fine. There are no maximum bond amounts for a felony DWI in Minnesota. DUI Ticket Price The DUI ticket cost can increase if you receive a conviction for DWI. During an initial consultation, many people ask, How much is a DUI fine? The DUI ticket price depends on the charges.  Minnesota categorizes DUI charges by degrees. The maximum fine depends on the severity of the charges. Maximum fines under Minnesota’s DUI laws are: $1,000 for fourth-degree DWI, which is a misdemeanor; $3,000 for second- or third-degree DWI and breath test refusal, which are gross misdemeanor charges; and $14,000 for first-degree DWI, which is a felony. The maximum fines do not include surcharges or court costs. Also, a judge may assess these fines in addition to any jail time ordered by the court after a DUI conviction. Additional DUI Ticket Costs Most people charged with DUI ask about the DUI fines a court can impose. They do not ask about the other costs included as part of the average cost of DUI. Additional potential costs associated with a DUI conviction in Minnesota include: Ignition interlock device for 12 months—approximately $120 to install and $100 per month for maintenance; License reinstatement fees—$680 plus a $26.25 application fee;  Towing or impound fees—approximately $180;  Probation fees; Chemical dependency and treatment fee—$25; and Penalty assessment of $1,000 for an alcohol content reading of 0.16% or greater. Other expenses included in the average DUI cost are insurance increases of approximately 37% and possible lost wages. Keep DUI Costs to a Minimum By Avoiding a DUI Conviction The financial cost of even a first-offense DUI is enormous if you are convicted. One way to avoid paying the average cost for a DUI is to avoid a DUI conviction altogether. Consulting a highly trained and experienced Minnesota DUI attorney from the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka could help you minimize your financial burden associated with a DWI charge. Call us today at 651-222-6603 to discuss your options.

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Navigating Slip and Fall at Work Settlements in MN

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Have you been injured in a workplace slip and fall accident in Minnesota? These accidents are all too common, with nearly 700 workers killed in slip and fall accidents each year. Slip and fall accidents also cause more than 25% of all workplace injuries. If you experienced a slip and fall injury at work, you may need an attorney. Slip and fall accidents can cause life-altering injuries that impact your ability to work and provide for your family. Slip and fall at work settlements can compensate for the harm you suffered and allow you to pay the bills that may be piling up. Common Causes of Slip and Falls at Work In a busy work environment, employers must pay diligent attention to workers’ and customers’ safety. These common causes of slip and falls are likely to injure a worker: Uneven flooring, Spilled liquid, Loose flooring, Recently polished floors, Dim lighting, Wires stretched across the floor, Broken stairs, and Equipment left on the floor. Unfortunately, these hazards can seriously injure or even kill a worker. If you suffer an injury at work, your employer is responsible to compensate you under workers’ compensation law, regardless of whose fault the accident was. Additionally, you may be able to pursue a personal injury claim against third parties who act negligently, such as manufacturers and independent contractors. What to Do After a Slip and Fall After you experience a slip and fall at work, you’ll want to do these things right away: Seek medical attention to treat urgent injuries; Notify your employer that you slipped and fell at work; Take photos or gather other documentation of the circumstances of your accident; Write down the names of witnesses to the accident; and Contact an attorney for help determining whether to file for workers’ compensation or pursue a personal injury lawsuit. It’s important to take immediate action after your accident so that your employer doesn’t dispute your claim. Notifying your employer, “I fell at work,” and seeking medical attention will alert them to the severity of your injury. Evidence gathered at the scene of your fall at work and witness statements can help validate your version of events. How a Lawyer Can Help You may feel confused by the pushback you get from supervisors after you file an accident claim. Of course, employers don’t want to pay injured workers unless they have to. Hiring an attorney gives you a determined advocate who will pressure your employer to pay all legally required compensation. The attorneys at Arechigo & Stokka can help you evaluate the various Minnesota laws that apply to your case, from workers’ compensation to personal injury and product liability. Our attorneys will advise you on your best strategy for maximum compensation and work passionately on your behalf. Contact us today for a free consultation. Our legal professionals have decades of experience representing injured workers in slip and fall at work settlements. As a two-attorney firm, we deliver personalized representation and diligent focus on each client, attention that is difficult to find at a big law firm.  We would appreciate hearing your story and considering how we can help you win maximum slip and fall compensation.

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Is Sexting a Crime in Minnesota?

    | Read Time: 5 minutes

Sexting, per se, is not a crime in Minnesota. Minnesota has not enacted any legislation specifically prohibiting sexting among minors. However, Minnesota law enforcement investigators and prosecutors rely on Minnesota’s existing laws to prosecute and convict people who engaged in sexting with a child or sexting involving a child. The consequences of a conviction for charges related to sexting and minors are incredibly severe. Not only are long prison sentences a genuine possibility, but the person convicted of these charges may also need to register as a predatory offender. If you find yourself under investigation or charged with crimes involving sexting and minors, or if your child could be in trouble for these crimes, contact Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., immediately. We will put together an aggressive defense strategy designed to eliminate or minimize the disruption sexting charges may have on your life.  Overview of Sexting  The term sexting became part of our vernacular several years ago. Sexting is the act of sending sexually explicit or suggestive text messages to another by any electronic means. Sexting is a risky behavior, even if it is just two consenting adults flirting with each other. Electronic messages containing sexually explicit content do not simply go away. They could be used later to embarrass, harass, or annoy one of the participants if the relationship sours. A person could face legal consequences for sexting if the person in possession of a graphic photo or video disseminates it without consent for public display. This is known as revenge porn.  The State of Minnesota recognizes the vulnerability of children. The state restricts access to sexually explicit material to people over 17 in an attempt to protect children. Moreover, a teenager could face criminal charges by sexting with another teenager or an adult, even if the adult consents.  When Is Sexting Child Pornography in Minnesota? It is illegal for children to send nude photos to each other or an adult. Minnesota law prohibits explicitly depicting a child in the nude or while performing a sex act. Also, Minnesota law outlaws possessing or disseminating pornographic materials showing children. Minnesota’s child pornography laws are strict. A teenager who possesses a nude photo, even of their significant other, if one of the participants is a minor, could face child pornography charges in Minnesota.  Sexting and Child Endangerment As a parent or guardian, you could get in trouble for sexting involving your children if you do not immediately stop the behavior. Under Minnesota law, a parent or guardian faces significant imprisonment if their child suffers physically, emotionally, or psychologically and the parent or guardian permitted the sexual abuse. Learning about your child engaging in sexting and failing to stop it could result in criminal charges for child endangerment.  Disseminating Harmful Matter to Juveniles Displaying explicit photos to a child and soliciting children to engage in sexual conduct like sexting are crimes in Minnesota. Using a computer or other electronic device to solicit children to send nude pictures or pornographic videos, including sexualized language, is a felony and can be prosecuted for engaging in electronic solicitation of a minor. Practically speaking, a minor who describes sexual activity to another minor via text commits a felony, even if committing the act itself might not be a crime due to Minnesota’s “Romeo and Juliet” law. Sexting Punishments in Minnesota Punishments for sexting depend on the severity of the offense. For example, possession of child pornography is a felony punishable by incarceration for up to ten years. Dissemination of child pornography is also a felony, and the person so convicted faces up to 15 years of imprisonment. Distributing sexual material to a minor is a felony punishable by up to three years in prison. Disseminating revenge porn is a gross misdemeanor but could be a felony warranting three years in jail if certain aggravating factors apply.  Registering as a Sex Offender for Sexting Minnesota requires people convicted of certain crimes to register with the state’s predatory offender registry. A person convicted of possessing child pornography, soliciting a minor to engage in sexual conduct, or using a minor in a pornographic work may have to register as a predatory offender.  Possible Defenses to Sexting The sexting laws for adults differ from the laws applying to children involved in sexting. Consent is not a defense to sexting unless both parties are adults. Consent might be a defense to distributing private sexual images as well. Minnesota law does not recognize accidental viewing or possession of a pornographic image as a defense. However, a skilled criminal defense lawyer could argue that the person who viewed the image unintentionally should not be convicted of the crime. The First Amendment may also give rise to defenses in certain cases. Entrapment could be a valid defense to crimes like dissemination or creation, but not possession of child pornography.  Law enforcement investigators will examine phones, computers, tablets, and other electronic devices and account information to obtain evidence. The investigators must first obtain a search warrant or the individual’s consent to examine any electronic device suspected of containing contraband. Filing motions to suppress evidence found on electronic devices could be a successful line of defense. If the judge rules the police did not have probable cause to get a search warrant or your consent was ineffective, the judge must exclude all evidence illegally seized from the trial.  Every case is different. Talking with a seasoned Minnesota criminal defense attorney about your specific case is the best way to understand which defenses might apply in your particular situation. Ask Us Any Questions You May Have The Minnesota criminal defense lawyers with Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., are available to discuss your case with you as soon as possible. Waiting to see what happens could be devastating. Call 651-222-6603 today to speak with an experienced Minnesota criminal defense attorney about whether you could face charges for sexting. Recent Case Result Free Speech Argued at Minnesota Supreme Court Criminal Defense Attorney John Arechigo continued to advocate for dismissal of charges...

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Workers’ Compensation Light Duty Work | What Is It?

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If you’ve been injured in a work accident, you are probably concerned about how long it will take for you to get back to work. Even if you are not fully healed, you may be able to return to work with certain limitations. Your doctor will assess your situation and recommend specific restrictions. Then you may be able to return to work under these restrictions with workers’ compensation light duty work. What Is Light Duty Work? Light duty work is a modified version of your current position or an entirely new job. Your employer will consider your physical limitations and offer a variation of your current position or a new position that suits your needs. Depending on your situation, you may need to perform less physical work or work shorter hours. Your employer should be willing to help you during this time. Should your employer not take your limitations seriously, do not hesitate to contact a workers’ compensation attorney. Examples of Light Duty Work Light duty work can look very different depending on the type of work. Some examples of light duty work include: Working a desk job, Performing office duties, Taking inventory, and Answering telephones. Depending on the type of work you do, your employer will know how to cater to your physical needs. If your employer cannot tailor your current position, they may assign you to an entirely new job until you can return to work with no limitations.  Does Light Duty Work Affect Your Benefits? Light duty work may affect your workers’ compensation benefits. If you are making less than you were before your accident, you may be eligible to receive lost wage benefits. However, if you are earning the same or more than you were earning before your accident, you will not be able to receive any lost wage benefits. Turning down light duty work may negatively impact your workers’ compensation benefits. If your employer offers you light duty work acceptable for your limitations and you do not accept, you might lose your right to collect lost wage benefits altogether. Act Quickly If your employer is willing to offer workers’ comp light duty work suitable for you and your physical restrictions, act promptly and accept it. An employer may work with their employee to come up with a mutually agreeable start date. Once all details are set, the employer will expect the employee to show up to work. Failing to do so may result in the employer rescinding their offer and negatively impact your workers’ compensation benefits.  Contact a Workers’ Compensation Attorney If You Need Help Workers’ compensation can be frustrating and confusing. Should you need help with your claim or benefits, contact a qualified workers’ compensation attorney. They will work with you to make sure you receive the benefits you deserve.  Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., has over a decade of experience helping clients navigate workers’ compensation claims. We pride ourselves on offering the specialized attention and dedication you won’t find at the large firms. Our team strives to be open and accessible to clients when they need us most. Contact us today, and let’s discuss your case.

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Is Resisting Arrest a Felony or Misdemeanor in MN?

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Minnesota had its share of clashes between citizens and law enforcement over the last year. Regrettably, the clashes started when police used excessive force to restrain a person under arrest and that person died. That person’s name is George Floyd. The police claimed George Floyd resisted. From that incident, the country became acutely aware that excessive police use of force is real. Police sometimes claim people resist arrest to justify using excessive force. If you were arrested for resisting arrest or obstructing arrest in Minnesota, you might be wondering: Why was I arrested for resisting arrest? What is resisting arrest? Is resisting arrest a felony or misdemeanor in Minnesota? What is the punishment for resisting arrest? How could I get resisting arrest charges dropped? The Minnesota criminal defense lawyers with Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., will use their decades of experience and knowledge gained by defending hundreds of cases to fight for justice on your behalf. They will explain the charges, consult with you to develop a defense strategy, and tirelessly work to get the best result for you. What Is Resisting Arrest? Resisting arrest in Minnesota is also called obstructing legal process, arrest, or firefighting. A person is guilty of obstructing legal process if they intentionally obstruct, resist, or interfere with a police officer in the performance of legal duties, or obstruct, hinder, or prevent a person’s apprehension on a criminal charge.  The Minnesota legislature intentionally wrote the law in very broad terms. Under the law, resisting arrest means: Refusing to be handcuffed; Refusing to surrender; Struggling with the police; Wrestling or fighting with the police; or Somehow preventing the police from making an arrest. Acts such as running from police, refusing to stop for police, and escape from a detention facility are crimes governed by other Minnesota laws. Penalties for Resisting Arrest in Minnesota The possible sanctions for resisting depend on the severity and dangerousness of the conduct alleged by police. Minnesota law punishes resisting arrest as a felony if: The person knew or should have known the act created a risk of death, substantial bodily harm, or significant damage to property; or The act did cause death, serious bodily injury, or substantial property damage. Felony resisting arrest carries a maximum state prison term of five years, a fine up to $10,000, or both fine and imprisonment. Resisting arrest is a gross misdemeanor punishable by no more than one year in prison, a $3,000 fine, or both if the act or threat was forceful or violent but did not cause death, substantial bodily injury, or substantial property damage. Otherwise, misdemeanor resisting arrest carries a maximum sentence of 90 days, a $1,000 fine, or both. Defenses to Resisting Arrest in Minnesota Even if the police made a mistake, no one should resist law enforcement’s attempts to arrest a person. Minnesota law favors resorting to the court system to resolve disputes and rights violations instead of fighting with police on the street. In reality, individuals will stand up for their rights if they feel that they are being abused. A person charged with resisting arrest could argue self-defense at trial, especially if the police were abusive. They can also argue that the officer exaggerated or fabricated the charges. An accused may also argue the police officer was not performing official legal duties during the incident that led to the alleged resisting arrest. In other words, the defense can fight to establish the police officer had no legal authority for the actions that led to the alleged resisting of arrest. How Could a Lawyer Help? An experienced Minnesota criminal defense attorney could explain to you how to get resisting arrest charges dropped. Negotiating with the prosecution for a reduced sentence to lesser charges could help you avoid a harsh prison sentence and avoid a felony conviction. Arguing motions to dismiss for a lack of probable cause could also help you get resisting arrest charges dropped before going to trial. Reach Out If You Need Help Arechigo & Stokka’s Minnesota resisting arrest defense lawyers are ready to use their tremendous experience and vast knowledge to get the best result for you. Contact Arechigo & Stokka, P.A., now by calling 651-222-6603 to learn more about how our firm can help you achieve the best result possible. 

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What Injuries Are Covered by Workers’ Compensation in St. Paul?

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Sometimes, no matter how careful and attentive you are, a workplace accident can occur. These accidents can leave you injured, frustrated, and unable to return to daily life. Fortunately, workers’ compensation may help ease the stresses and financial burden.  However, workers’ compensation does not cover all injuries. It is essential to know and understand the types of injuries that make an employee eligible for workers’ comp benefits.  Common Types of Accidents at Work Some employees have higher chances of work-related accidents than others, including construction workers, truck drivers, and warehouse workers. The most common causes of accidents at work include: Slip and falls, Falls from heights, Tool and equipment malfunctions, Lifting accidents, Electrocutions, and Items falling on employees. No two workplace accidents will look the same, and the kind of accident will depend on the industry and work environment.  Types of Work Injuries Injuries can also vary significantly by industry and type of accident. Some of the most common types of work-related injuries include: Back and spine injuries, Broken bones, Lacerations, Burns, Soft tissue injuries, and Traumatic brain injuries.  Work injuries are not only those that are seen and felt, like broken bones and laceration. Toxic exposure in the workplace that leads to specific health issues, including cancers, can also be covered by workers’ compensation.  If you are unsure whether workers’ compensation will cover your injury, speak to a St. Paul workers’ compensation attorney. What Is a Compensable Injury? In Minnesota, injuries must occur during the course of employment to be considered compensable. For an injury to be compensable: The injured party must be an employee, not an independent contractor; The injury must be the result of a work-related accident; and The injury must lead to some impairment and/or lost wages.  If the injury does not satisfy these requirements, it is considered a non-compensable injury, and the employee will be unlikely to receive workers’ compensation benefits. Can I Be Forced to Go Back to Work After an Injury? Whether or not you return to work will depend on the severity of your injuries and your doctor’s recommendations. If your injuries are severe and impose limitations on your physical activity, you will not be expected to return to work. However, if your injuries do not stop you from working altogether, you may need to return to work. Every time you visit your doctor for your work injury, they will assess your physical health. They will determine whether you should take time off work, if you can return to work with some restrictions, or if you can work with no limitations.  If your doctor decides you are well enough to return to work, either with or without restrictions, you will need to go back to work. If you do not return to work, you will risk losing your workers’ compensation benefits.  Contact a Workers’ Compensation Attorney Today Workers’ compensation can be tricky to navigate, and you don’t want to risk losing your benefits. It is best to seek the help of a workers’ compensation attorney. Your attorney will help ensure you take the necessary steps to receive all your benefits.  Arechigo and Stokka, P.A., has been working with injured clients for over a decade. We offer clients the time and dedication they deserve while fighting tirelessly for their rights. Our team knows the impact an injury can have on clients and their families, and we’re always ready to help when they need it most. Contact us today to discuss your case. 

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What is Maximum Medical Improvement in Minnesota (MMI)?

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At some point in your workers’ compensation case you will run into the term “maximum medical improvement”. Depending on the timing of this designation it can, and most likely will, effect your benefits. What is Maximum Medical Improvement in Minnesota? Maximum medical improvement in Minnesota is defined as “the date after which no further significant recovery from or significant lasting improvement to a personal injury can reasonably be anticipated, based upon reasonable medical probability.” In most cases, this designation of being at maximum medical improvement will occur after an Independent Medical Examination.  However, in some cases, your treating doctor will submit a report stating that you, the employee, has reached maximum medical improvement. There are specific requirements that must be adhered to by the doctor and insurance company to place you at maximum medical improvement, such as: there must be a medical opinion indicating the employee has reached it, It must be served on the employee and attorney, and It must contain specific identifying information such as name, SSN, date of service, and other statutory requirements. After an Employee Receives the Report After an employee receives the report indicating she/he has reached maximum medical improvement, the next issue is to determine how this will effect your benefits. If you are receiving temporary total disability benefits, these will continue for an additional 90 days.   Medical benefits will continue if you have been given a permanent restriction by your treating doctor and the IME report does not contain information to the effect that there are no lasting effects from the work injury. The designation of maximum medical improvement will not effect your temporary partial disability benefits unless the IME doctor states that your symptoms are not the result of the work injury. When to Contact an Attorney When you receive a letter from the insurance company indicating you are at maximum medical improvement, it is important to contact an attorney. Certain timelines are applicable and an attorney will need to submit certain information to the Department of Labor or the Office of Administrative Hearings before these deadlines pass. Additionally, many doctors and insurance companies try to prematurely place you at maximum medical improvement.  If this is the case, we will fight to get your benefits back. No attorney fees are associated with hiring an attorney under Minnesota workers’ compensation law unless there is a successful resolution of disputed benefits or there is a settlement of your case.  And as always, there are no out of pocket fees.

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How Much Does a Criminal Defense Lawyer Cost in St. Paul, MN?

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If you have been charged with a crime in Minnesota, one of the first questions on your mind is likely, how much does a criminal lawyer cost?  The amount a defense attorney charges can vary depending on a number of case-specific factors, such as the number and severity of charges filed by the state, the location of your case, the likelihood of a trial, the extent of pre-trial motion hearings, and the overall complexity of the case. An attorney’s level of expertise and experience also factors into a fee for representation. When you meet with potential lawyers, you should ask them questions that will help you determine what your criminal defense attorney will cost. Hiring a good defense lawyer can make a significant difference to the outcome of your case. You need the best possible representation at a reasonable price. The experienced criminal defense attorneys at Arechigo & Stokka have decades of experience successfully defending people against criminal charges in St. Paul and throughout Minnesota. What Do Criminal Defense Attorneys Do? Criminal defense attorneys have one responsibility: protect their clients’ constitutional rights.  The legal system in Minnesota is too complicated for a person who lacks the necessary experience to navigate. A St. Paul defense attorney who has represented hundreds of clients successfully in the Minnesota criminal justice system can help you make the right choices by offering sound legal advice. An aggressive St. Paul criminal defense lawyer will devise a sound strategy to align with your desired outcome. The stakes are high in a criminal case. The accused faces possible jail or prison time, the imposition of fines, probation, and the lasting impact of a criminal record, if convicted. Most people do not consider the consequences of a conviction beyond the punishment levied by a judge. Every person facing a criminal charge must also be aware of collateral consequences, such as immigration consequences and the potential to lose a driver’s license or professional license. Criminal charges could mean job loss, loss of educational opportunities, and strained family relationships, depending on the allegations. A dedicated St. Paul, MN criminal defense lawyer will advise you of all of your rights. An experienced criminal defense attorney who is genuinely concerned about you will take the time to explain all of your options and the consequences of the choices, so you and your family can make an informed decision.  How Much Do Lawyers Cost for Criminal Defense? Our clients always ask about our criminal defense attorney fees. We understand that our clients have much to consider when deciding if it makes sense for them to hire a criminal defense lawyer. We base our fee structure on the severity of the charges and the complexity of the case. Some felony cases will require more investigation, motion work, preparation, and trial time. Other cases, such as misdemeanors, are less complicated and could be handled quickly. We can discuss our fee structure during our free consultation. How Do the Fees for a Criminal Lawyer Work? Our mission is to provide people who face criminal charges or are under investigation for a criminal offense in St. Paul, the best representation possible. The average criminal defense attorney fees we charge depend on the particular case. We will work with you and your family to develop a fee structure that ensures you have excellent legal representation throughout your case.  Protecting your rights and preserving your freedom remains our priority.  Is Hiring a Criminal Defense Lawyer Worth It? Each person brought before the court on a criminal charge with the possibility of facing jail time has the right to be represented by counsel. A person facing criminal charges has three options. They can hire a private lawyer, ask for a public defender, or proceed without a lawyer, which is called “pro se.”    Self-representation in a St. Paul criminal case could be dangerous. A pro se defendant must know all the relevant laws and procedural rules. Pro se defendants do not receive a break because they are not lawyers. A public defender may save you money, but may not get you the best outcome. Well-intentioned but highly overworked lawyers staff the public defender’s office. Your case is one of many a public defender must handle. There are also income limitations to qualify for a public defender. Hiring your own lawyer gives you the best chance of a positive outcome. You will receive the personal attention you deserve when you hire a St. Paul criminal defense lawyer.  Reach Out If You Need Help Contact the experienced and tenacious St. Paul criminal defense attorneys from Arechigo & Stokka today. Fill out our online form or call us at (651) 362-4355 for a free consultation. We can answer additional questions you have about how much does a criminal lawyer cost after we have gathered relevant information about your case. Additionally, we will discuss all your options and a plan to develop a successful defense strategy. You can rely on our extensive criminal defense experience to fight for the most advantageous outcome for you.

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