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If you work for Starbucks, you may enjoy great coffee and friendly co-workers. But what if you get hurt at work? Can you get money for your injuries through Starbucks’ workers’ compensation insurance?

How Workers’ Compensation Works in Minnesota

In Minnesota, all employers must provide workers’ compensation benefits to their employees for work-related illnesses and injuries. In most cases, employers purchase workers’ compensation insurance to cover such benefits.

Some employers may self-insure workers’ compensation benefits. This means that the company pays for work-related injuries out of its own funds rather than using an insurance carrier (which requires approval from the Minnesota Department of Commerce). 

If you are injured while working for Starbucks, workers’ compensation will likely pay for your medical bills, lost wages, and rehabilitation and retraining services. Workers’ comp will not, however, pay for monetary damages often associated with a personal injury claim, like pain and suffering, emotional distress, and punitive damages.

Starbucks Workers’ Compensation Claims

As a Starbucks employee, you may experience a work-related illness or injury when you least expect it. For example, you may:

  • Burn yourself with hot Starbucks coffee;
  • Cut your hand while opening coffee bean bags;
  • Break your ankle from slipping on a wet floor;
  • Hurt your back while moving tables and chairs; or
  • Contract a respiratory illness from a workplace toxin.

Whether your injury is minor or catastrophic, you need to report it to your supervisor immediately to begin a Starbucks workers’ comp claim. 

If your injury or illness causes you to miss three or more days of work, Starbucks must report your workers’ compensation claim to its insurer. The Starbucks workers’ compensation insurance carrier will either accept your claim and begin paying benefits or deny your claim. 

Denial of Your Starbucks Workers’ Comp Claim

Workers’ compensation insurers may deny claims for a variety of reasons, some that are warranted and some that are not. For example, it is legal for a workers’ compensation carrier to deny coverage when:

  • You didn’t report your injury or illness within 14 days;
  • Your medical condition is not work-related; or
  • You decline treatment or refuse to be examined by an independent medical examiner.

However, many denials are based on questionable or unlawful grounds. For example, if Starbucks states that you were not an employee at the time of your injury or terminates you before you filed your Starbucks workers’ compensation claim, they may have improperly denied your claim. 

Questions About Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Process

If you are going through the Starbucks workers’ compensation process for the first time, you may have many questions.

For example, may Starbucks or its workers’ compensation insurer require you to see their doctor rather than your own? What if they send a nurse case manager to attend your doctor visits? How much of your medical history may the insurance carrier request? Can Starbucks fire you for missing work while you recover from your work-related injury?

Our experienced Minnesota workers’ compensation lawyers at the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka will answer these and many other questions for you. 

Contact Us for a Free Workers’ Compensation Consultation

Don’t go through a Starbucks workers’ compensation claim alone. Contact us immediately to make sure you get all the workers’ compensation benefits to which you are entitled. Joshua Stokka devotes his entire law practice to representing injured workers in Minnesota. He’ll give you personal attention and the workers’ compensation answers you need.

Author Photo

Joshua R. Stokka

Josh has been representing injured workers for over 10 years. Josh was born and raised in Fargo, North Dakota, and attended the University of Minnesota-Duluth where he earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminology. Mr. Stokka alson received his law degree from the Hamline University School of Law. During law school, Josh clerked at a Minnesota law firm specializing in personal injury and workers’ compensation. Prior to practicing in the area of workers’ compensation, Josh clerked for a judge in the 7th Judicial District in Minnesota. This valuable experience gave him insight into how judges think, do their jobs behind the scene, and how to frame a case in order to obtain a favorable result.  Now, he focuses 100% of his practice on defending injured workers in Minnesota.

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