Understanding Reckless Driving in MN

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If you have a driver’s license, you know that there are many traffic laws that drivers must obey. Many are aware of what constitutes speeding or a DUI, but do you understand what constitutes reckless driving? Do you know what the penalties are? Or why you might need an attorney if you get charged with this offense? Since reckless driving charges can impact your driving privileges and potentially even your freedom, these are important concepts to understand. What Exactly Is Reckless Driving in Minnesota? Under Minnesota statute section 169.13, reckless driving is defined as driving in a way that poses a substantial, significant, and unjustifiable risk to the welfare and safety of others. For driving to qualify as reckless, the vehicle operator must be aware of this risk and consciously disregard it. The risk may be to another person’s well-being or property. In other words, the driver must exhibit a deliberate disregard for other people’s safety to be charged with this crime. Racing is one example of reckless driving that the statute addresses explicitly. Penalties The penalties for reckless driving are fairly straightforward. Standard reckless driving in MN is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and up to a $1,000 fine. However, be aware that if your driving record has prior infractions, you could also lose your driving privileges. The amount of time you stand to lose your license depends on whether you had prior traffic vioaltions. Furthermore, if your recklessness resulted in serious bodily injury to someone else, your charge will likely be upgraded. Standard misdemeanors can be upgraded to gross misdemeanors, which carry sentences of up to one year in jail and up to a $3,000 fine.  Do I Need a Lawyer? As far as traffic offenses go, the need for a lawyer is perhaps never so great as when an officer charges you with reckless driving in MN. That is because the laws prohibiting such behavior are quite broad and can be misconstrued by law enforcement. Imperfect officers can see something that appears to be reckless when, in fact, it is not. Only experienced criminal defense attorneys can properly assess the facts of your case and determine whether reckless driving was the appropriate charge. It is possible that the circumstances more accurately reflect the less severe charge of careless driving or speeding.  We Can Help Traffic offenses may not seem serious at first. But criminal traffic infractions can result in jail time, steep fines, and a tarnished driving record. When so much is at stake, you need an experienced attorney by your side. The Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka has decades of experience in defending people just like you from criminal charges that threaten to upend their lives. First, we closely examine the evidence in your case. Then we seek to lessen the severity of the charges or defend against them completely. One thing is certain: We will make sure that your rights are protected every step of the way. So call us today at 651-222-6603, or contact us online to set up your free initial consultation.

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Reckless Discharge of a Firearm in MN

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If you are a gun owner, you probably enjoy using your gun in a variety of ways. Some people keep their guns on hand solely for safety purposes, while others like to hunt. Some enjoy target practice. Regardless of how you choose to enjoy your gun, you must first learn how to use it properly. That involves practice, and practice means discharging your weapon. But where and how you choose to fire your gun can have consequences, so it is important to know Minnesota firearm discharge laws. Minnesota Firearm Discharge Laws Minnesota statute section 609.66 addresses which actions involving dangerous weapons constitute a crime. Some crimes are misdemeanors, such as: Recklessly handling a weapon or firearm in a way that could potentially endanger other people; Pointing a gun at someone, even if the gun is not loaded; and Manufacturing, selling, or possessing a dangerous item with the intent to use it unlawfully as a weapon against someone else. Other actions are considered felonies. Section 609.66 (1a)(3) states that firing or discharging a firearm recklessly within a municipality in the state of Minnesota is a felony. Reckless Discharge of a Firearm Sentence A judge can sentence you to up to one year in jail and impose up to a $3,000 fine for the misdemeanor offenses listed above. Minnesota Statutes Section 609.66 (1b)(1) and (1b)(2) address the felony penalties for recklessly discharging a firearm. Essentially, you can be sentenced to up to five years in prison and receive up to a $10,000 fine if the discharge occurs in: A park zone, A public housing zone, or A school zone. Courts consider it less severe if the discharge happens almost anywhere else, imposing a lesser sentence of up to two years in prison and up to a $5,000 fine. With so much at stake, it is important to understand the reckless discharge of a firearm sentence that might apply to you. Recklessness The law states that reckless discharge of a firearm in Minnesota is a crime. But this statement can leave you wondering what the term “reckless” means in this context. A person is said to have acted recklessly if they knew or should have known that their actions could cause harm to others. To help determine if specific actions were reckless, the court employs both a subjective and an objective test. The subjective test asks whether a specific person in a specific situation knew or should have known that their actions could cause harm to others. The objective test asks whether a “reasonable person” would know that their actions were dangerous.  We Can Defend You Gun charges are serious and can affect your ability to own firearms well into the future. If you find yourself charged with a gun crime, it is important to hire an experienced gun rights attorney. The Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka has decades of experience defending your right to bear arms, and we will make sure that your rights are protected every step of the way. So call today, or set up a free consultation online.

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Home Depot Workers’ Compensation Overview

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Home Depot is a favorite for do-it-yourselfers, but employees face workplace hazards every day while serving customers. Work accidents can easily occur, leaving an employee injured and facing mounting medical bills. Fortunately, if you are an employee injured at Home Depot, you may be able to receive workers’ compensation benefits.  What Is Workers’ Compensation? Workers’ compensation is a special type of insurance for employees. If you suffer an accident in the scope of your employment, workers’ compensation can provide benefits to ease financial strain.  If you’ve been injured while working at Home Depot, contact a workers’ compensation attorney as soon as possible.  Available Workers’ Compensation Benefits Minnesota Home Depot workers’ comp can cover various expenses related to your workplace accident and injuries. These include: Medical expenses, Disability, Lost wages, and  Rehabilitation benefits.  You may not be aware of what benefits you are entitled to. A Minnesota workers’ comp attorney can review the details of your case and help you get what you deserve. Common Home Depot Workplace Accidents and Injuries Home Depot is always bustling, and there are many opportunities for workplace accidents to occur. Some common types of workplace accidents include: Falling objects, Slip and falls, Equipment accidents, and Falls from heights. Injuries can vary in severity, depending on the type of accident. Resulting injuries could include: Lacerations, Fractures or broken bones, Head and neck injuries, and Back and spinal cord injuries. Whatever your accident and resulting injury, you may be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. Be sure to file a Home Depot injury claim. What to Do After a Home Depot Work Accident To get the benefits you deserve, there are specific steps you should take after a Home Depot workplace accident. What you do after your accident can impact your ability to collect benefits. Get Medical Help Always put your health and well-being first. If your injuries are severe, call 911. Otherwise, visit your doctor as soon as possible. Explain the details of your accident, and let them know you are there for a Home Depot workers’ compensation claim. Your doctor will have to complete a Report of Work Ability form with details of your accident, injuries, and resulting limitations. Be sure to give your employer a copy of the completed form.  Report Your Workplace Accident Home Depot workers’ compensation policy requires you to report your accident as soon as you can. Aside from getting medical treatment, this is the most important step. Failing to report your accident to a supervisor or manager can result in your inability to receive benefits that you would be entitled to. After you report your accident, your supervisor will need to fill out a First Report of Injury (FROI) form.  Contact a Workers’ Compensation Attorney Home Depot work accidents can come with physical and financial burdens. Help ensure you’re getting every benefit you’re entitled to by contacting a workers’ compensation attorney.  A Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Attorney Can Help You The Criminal Defense Attorney and Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka has been proudly representing injured clients for over a decade. We approach every case compassionately while fiercely representing our clients and their rights. Our firm strives to be transparent and easily accessible, allowing our clients to feel confident and secure. We offer free case evaluations. Contact us today.

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UPS Workers’ Compensation Overview

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UPS employees have busy jobs, which often lead to work accidents. Fortunately, UPS workers’ compensation is available for UPS employees injured while on the job. It is important to become familiar with UPS workers’ comp and what it can mean for you. What Is Workers’ Compensation? Workers’ compensation is a type of insurance for employees, including those working for UPS. If you suffer an injury while acting in the scope of employment, you can file a UPS workers’ comp claim. Workers’ compensation helps cover expenses and financial losses from your workplace injury. If you’ve been injured while working for UPS, do not hesitate to contact a workers’ compensation attorney to help ensure you get the benefits you deserve. Types of UPS Workers’ Compensation Benefits Available After a work accident, you can file a workers’ comp claim to receive benefits. The benefits available in Minnesota for workers’ compensation include: Medical expenses, Lost wages, Disability benefits, and Rehabilitation benefits. If you are unsure of what benefits you are entitled to, contact a workers’ compensation attorney. Common UPS Work Injuries Working for UPS can be very hectic and stressful. Therefore, accidents while on the job are common. Some of the most common injuries for UPS employees include: Head and neck injuries, Knee and hip injuries, Back and spinal cord injuries, Shoulder injuries, Fractures or broken bones, and Lacerations. Depending on the type of accident, workplace injuries can range in severity. If you’ve been injured on the job, be sure to file a UPS workman’s comp claim.  What to Do Following a UPS Workplace Injury The steps you take after a work accident are crucial. Following these steps can help you get the benefits you deserve from UPS workers’ comp. Get Medical Care After a work accident, put your health first. If the resulting injuries are severe, call 911 right away. Otherwise, be sure to visit your primary care physician. Notify the doctor that the reason for your visit is UPS workers’ comp. The doctor will complete a Report of Work Ability form detailing your physical injuries and limitations. Your employer and insurer should receive copies of these forms. Report Your Accident Reporting your accident to your immediate supervisor or manager is part of the UPS injury policy. Employers must file a First Report of Injury (FROI) form. Failing to report your accident may prevent you from receiving UPS workers’ compensation benefits.  Talk to a Workers’ Compensation Attorney UPS workers’ compensation settlements can differ depending on your circumstances. However, in some cases, you may not be receiving the workers’ comp benefits you deserve, or you may be denied altogether. Discuss your situation with a workers’ compensation attorney. They will get you on the right path to the benefits you need. Contact a Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Attorney Today The Criminal Defense Attorney and Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka has been serving injured clients since 2007. Our firm prides itself on offering the highest quality legal representation while providing clients with the patience and understanding they seek. We are committed to fighting for our clients’ rights. We offer free consultations. Contact us today to get started. 

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Is a DWI a Felony in MN?

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When is a DWI a Felony in MN? Not every DWI is a felony in Minnesota. You can face charges for felony DWI, but a series of aggravating factors is required to trigger a felony DWI in Minnesota. In fact, a large percentage of DUI/DWI crimes in MN are felonies. But even if the court finds you guilty of a misdemeanor, the penalties you face can be life-changing. In addition to the potential for going to jail, you will have to pay substantial fines as well as court costs and fees. You could lose your driver license, your license plates, or even your vehicle. With the help of a DUI defense attorney, these charges can potentially be reduced or eliminated. Contact our office today to discuss your specific case and possible defenses. What Is a Misdemeanor DWI? Typically, you will face misdemeanor charges for your first DWI offense. If any aggravating factors apply to your arrest, however, the court could charge you with a gross misdemeanor. Aggravating factors include: Having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.16 or above, Having a child age 16 or under in the car, Refusing to submit to BAC testing, and Having prior DWI convictions. Upon conviction for misdemeanor DUI/DWI, you could face 90 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. Although penalties are less harsh than the penalties for a felony, a gross misdemeanor DWI conviction could earn you up to one year in county jail. You will also face monetary fines up to $3,000 as well as a lengthy suspension of your driver license. What Is a Felony DWI in MN? In Minnesota, you will face felony DWI charges under any of the following circumstances: You have a prior felony DWI conviction on your record; You had a prior felony vehicular injury or homicide conviction involving impairment; or You had three or more DWI convictions in the past ten years. Although you may associate DWI with drinking and driving, you face the same penalties if you drive while under the influence of a Schedule I or II drug in any amount. Costs & Consequences of Felony DWI Upon conviction for a felony DWI in MN, you face up to seven years in a state prison and as much as $14,000 in fines. If you have prior felonies on your record, your penalties could be much worse. Further, the prosecutor can tack on additional charges based on the circumstances of your arrest. With a felony conviction, you also face years of supervised probation, long-term alcohol monitoring, and a host of administrative penalties. Administrative penalties may include: The cancelation or revocation of your driver license, The requirement to install an ignition interlock device on all your vehicles, Impoundment of your license plates, and/or Forfeiture of your vehicle. You will have a permanent criminal record, which can interfere with your ability to get a job or rent a home. You will also struggle to find affordable insurance coverage as a convicted DWI offender. When Should You Contact a Minnesota DUI Lawyer? Any DWI arrest – felony or misdemeanor – can substantially affect every aspect of your life. Don’t risk your future by agreeing to a deal with the prosecutor or trying to represent yourself in court. The Minnesota felony DWI lawyers of Arechigo & Stokka understand how frightening this experience can be, and we are here to help you. We have assisted hundreds of clients facing misdemeanor and felony DUI/DWI charges. Let us put our extensive knowledge, experience, and resources to work for you. Still have questions to see if your Minnesota DWI charge is a felony? We offer a no-cost, no-obligation consultation to answer your questions and help you make the right choice for your future. Contact us today to learn more.

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Changing Workers’ Comp Lawyers in MN | What to Know

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When you experience a workplace accident, you need someone on your side to help you navigate the legal path to compensation. You may trust your workers’ compensation attorney to fight for you. It’s understandable if you feel betrayed when your lawyer doesn’t put forth an adequate effort. What can you do when you have a bad workers’ compensation attorney? If you’re wondering how to fire your workers’ comp attorney, you’ve come to the right place. Here, we present several tips for finding the right attorney and getting the money you deserve. Can I Fire My Workers’ Comp Attorney? You can always fire an attorney, though the reverse isn’t true. A lawyer can’t always abandon a client. Before you fire your attorney, you’ll want to think about the consequences of that action. Also, you want to make sure that you have a good attorney to take over your claim. Why Should I Fire My Attorney? Clients usually want to fire attorneys who aren’t doing a good job. Sometimes, delays or other inconveniences in the lawsuit process occur despite the attorney’s best efforts. Other times, an attorney may lack the knowledge or motivation to give your claim the attention it deserves. Here are some of the top reasons why clients fire workers’ compensation attorneys: The case is taking too long, The attorney doesn’t understand the details of workers’ compensation, The attorney seems lazy, and The attorney doesn’t communicate well. Though any of these are valid reasons to fire an attorney, you should not rush to sever your relationship. Find out if your perception of your attorney’s incompetence is accurate before taking action and changing workers’ comp lawyers. Questions to Ask Before Firing Your Attorney Before firing your attorney, you should ask a few questions to determine whether the relationship is worth saving. These questions should give you a better understanding of whether your attorney is giving their best effort to your case: What is causing the delay in my case? Is there anything you can do to speed up the claim resolution? Why haven’t you communicated with me regarding updates on my claim? Can we schedule regular phone calls or conferences to update me on my claim? How many workers’ compensation cases have you handled? Can I speak to any former clients who may be willing to share their experience regarding your representation? What steps have you taken to resolve my claim? Sometimes, the answers to these questions will convince you that your attorney is doing their best. All legal matters require patience, and you may be blaming your attorney for delays caused by red tape. However, if your attorney’s answers to these questions put you further on edge, it may be time to look for better representation. Consequences of Firing Your Attorney While firing your attorney may be necessary for your claim to succeed, the action does have potential consequences. Be aware of these risks before you fire your attorney: It could delay your claim, as a new attorney takes time to catch up on the process; You could lose money on attorney fees; You could wind up with a worse attorney; and It may be challenging to find another attorney, as they may see you as a difficult client. In addition to viewing you as a difficult client, other attorneys may hesitate to take your case if they think it won’t pay well. That’s because most workers’ compensation attorneys work on contingency, meaning you don’t pay them until they win your case. At that point, your attorney takes a portion of your settlement (usually 10-20%) as their payment. When you fire one attorney, that attorney is entitled to payment for the portion of work they performed. A second attorney knows they’ll have to split attorney fees with someone else and may hesitate to work for less pay than they usually get. Speak to Experienced Workers’ Compensation Attorneys If you are unhappy with your legal representation, call the experienced attorneys at the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka. Our lawyers have been representing injured workers for over a decade. We’re willing to take over workers’ comp cases where other lawyers have failed because we think every injured worker deserves superior legal representation. Contact us for a free consultation. You can ask any questions, and we’ll let you know if we can help with your claim.

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Understanding Workers’ Comp Settlements for Neck Injuries

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When you suffer a neck injury at work, it can impact your entire life. You may be in pain, unable to work, and struggling to pay bills. Workers’ compensation can help you get medical treatment and pay you wages while you’re out of work.  However, some companies don’t treat you fairly when you file a workers’ compensation claim. Our lawyers fight companies who harm employees or fail to give them fair compensation. We help clients get fair workers’ comp settlements for neck injuries. The first step to getting the money you need is understanding Minnesota workers’ compensation legal requirements. How Much Does Workers’ Comp Pay? Workers’ compensation is a no-fault system, meaning that even if you were responsible for your accident, it usually pays. However, workers’ compensation provides only limited payment, depending on the classification of your injury. While it’s hard for us to give an average workers’ compensation settlement, neck injury payments are based on the extent of your disability and your average wage before the accident.  After evaluating your workplace injury, a doctor may classify you as:  Temporarily partially disabled (TPD), Temporarily totally disabled (TTD), Permanently partially disabled (PPD), or Permanently totally disabled (PTD). Each injury classification allows for different compensation amounts for varying time periods. Temporary Disability Compensation Temporary disability workers’ compensation payments include: Two-thirds of your average weekly wage up to a maximum of $1,134.24 per week; and Medical bills. Temporary total disability payments cease when: You return to work; You reach maximum medical improvement (more medical treatment won’t help); or You reach 130 weeks of benefits for a temporary total disability. If you return to work with a temporary partial disability, you may not be able to work in the same role due to your injury. If your salary is reduced in your new workplace role, you can receive temporary partial disability payments to make up two-thirds of the difference. These temporary partial disability payments cease after you get them for 250 weeks or reach 450 weeks after your injury. Permanent Partial Disability Compensation If you are permanently partially disabled, you can receive a one-time workers’ compensation neck injury settlement sum or installment payments. Permanent disability payments are calculated based on the severity of your injury, and that required compensation schedule is provided in Minnesota law. Permanent Total Disability Compensation Permanent total disability qualifies you for two-thirds of your average wage (up to a maximum) for as long as you are disabled. This amount may reduce if you receive government disability payments. Get Legal Help for Workers’ Compensation At the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka, we have been helping work accident victims for decades. We have the legal experience and courage needed to fight big businesses that harm their employees. Workers’ comp neck injury settlements can help injured workers, so we pressure employers to pay fairly.  If you need help getting workers’ compensation, contact our attorneys for a free consultation. We’ll treat you with respect and fight for your rights to fair compensation.

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Minnesota Drug Trafficking Penalties

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Drug trafficking is generally known as the most serious drug offense that carries the stiffest penalties. Drug trafficking charges refer to the weight of the drugs either sold or possessed. Although Minnesota’s drug law prohibits selling, possessing to distribute, or possession of narcotics, it does not reference a drug trafficking charge by name. But like other states and the federal government, Minnesota reserves the most severe punishments for drug crimes that involve a high weight of the narcotics.  If you or a loved one faces drug trafficking charges in Minnesota, then you need a tough, experienced, and highly skilled drug trafficking defense lawyer to represent you. A seasoned Minnesota drug trafficking attorney with decades of experience knows how to create a defense strategy that minimizes your chances of spending many years in prison. What Is Drug Trafficking in Minnesota? Minnesota categorizes its drug crimes by the weight of the narcotics. The state’s most serious drug crimes are first-degree controlled substance crimes. A person violates Minnesota’s first-degree controlled substance crime drug trafficking law by either selling more than a threshold quantity of drugs within 90 days or possessing more than a threshold amount of drugs. The various thresholds for first-degree drug crimes depend on the type of drug. Trafficking By Selling Narcotics Under this section, a person is guilty of a controlled substance crime in the first degree by selling on one or more occasions during the previous 90 days: 17 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine; 10 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm or two aggravating factors; 10 grams of more of heroin;  50 grams or more of another narcotic other than cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin; 50 grams or more, or 200 dosage units, of amphetamine, phencyclidine, or hallucinogenic drug; or 25 kilograms of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol. Minnesota law allows prosecutors to include mixtures of non-narcotics in the total amount of drugs. Trafficking By Possession A person could be convicted of a controlled substance crime in the first degree by possessing a specified quantity of certain drugs as well. A person is guilty of controlled substance crime in the first degree by possessing: 50 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine; 25 grams or more of cocaine or methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm or two aggravating factors;  25 grams or more of heroin; 500 grams of a drug other than cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin, or 50 kilograms of marijuana or 500 marijuana plants. As with selling narcotics, the total weight includes the drugs and any other substance mixed in. How Much Jail Time for Drug Trafficking? The severity of the drug trafficking charges determines the amount of prison time a person could serve. A controlled substance crime in the first degree carries a maximum sentence of 30 years. The court could issue a fine of up to $1 million. However, the maximum penalty increases to 40 years if the accused has a previous controlled substance conviction. The law requires the person to receive at least four years in prison for a subsequent offense. The penalties increase if the state proves trafficking in the presence of aggravating factors. A person convicted of selling more than 100 grams or possessing over 500 grams of cocaine, methamphetamine, or heroin must serve 65 months in prison. The minimum mandatory is 86 months if the crime involved a firearm or the presence of two aggravating factors. People Facing Tough Drug Trafficking Penalties Need a Tough Lawyer If you or a loved one is facing drug trafficking charges in Minnesota, we can help. The drug tracking defense lawyers with the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka will rely on their extensive trial experience to fight for you. Call Arechigo & Stokka today at 651-222-6603 to defend your drug trafficking charges aggressively.

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How Much Does a DUI Cost In Minnesota?

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The average cost of a DUI or DWI in Minnesota is much more expensive than one might expect. DUI fees can be staggering in Minnesota. You need to understand the potential financial impact of a DUI in Minnesota if you face DUI charges, in addition to any criminal penalties you face. A qualified Minnesota DWI defense attorney could explain all of the potential DUI fees you could pay if a court finds you guilty of DWI. The facts and circumstances of your case dictate the choices you could make. However, frankly discussing your DUI case with a seasoned and dedicated DUI attorney from Minnesota would help you make the best decision for you and your family. Average Cost of DUI No one appreciates the amount of money a DUI costs until facing DWI charges. How much does a DUI cost, can only be determined after a thorough analysis of your case. However, DUI fees begin to pile up immediately after a DUI arrest.  A person under arrest for DWI in Minnesota may need to post bond, depending on the severity of the DUI offense. A non-monetary conditional release might be appropriate for a person charged with a first-offense DUI without aggravating factors. However, you may have to post a monetary bond if you had an alcohol content double the legal limit, face a subsequent offense or caused an accident with injuries or death. State law governs bonds in Minnesota. Under Minnesota’s bond law, the bond for a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor is double the maximum fine. There are no maximum bond amounts for a felony DWI in Minnesota. DUI Ticket Price The DUI ticket cost can increase if you receive a conviction for DWI. During an initial consultation, many people ask, How much is a DUI fine? The DUI ticket price depends on the charges.  Minnesota categorizes DUI charges by degrees. The maximum fine depends on the severity of the charges. Maximum fines under Minnesota’s DUI laws are: $1,000 for fourth-degree DWI, which is a misdemeanor; $3,000 for second- or third-degree DWI and breath test refusal, which are gross misdemeanor charges; and $14,000 for first-degree DWI, which is a felony. The maximum fines do not include surcharges or court costs. Also, a judge may assess these fines in addition to any jail time ordered by the court after a DUI conviction. Additional DUI Ticket Costs Most people charged with DUI ask about the DUI fines a court can impose. They do not ask about the other costs included as part of the average cost of DUI. Additional potential costs associated with a DUI conviction in Minnesota include: Ignition interlock device for 12 months—approximately $120 to install and $100 per month for maintenance; License reinstatement fees—$680 plus a $26.25 application fee;  Towing or impound fees—approximately $180;  Probation fees; Chemical dependency and treatment fee—$25; and Penalty assessment of $1,000 for an alcohol content reading of 0.16% or greater. Other expenses included in the average DUI cost are insurance increases of approximately 37% and possible lost wages. Keep DUI Costs to a Minimum By Avoiding a DUI Conviction The financial cost of even a first-offense DUI is enormous if you are convicted. One way to avoid paying the average cost for a DUI is to avoid a DUI conviction altogether. Consulting a highly trained and experienced Minnesota DUI attorney from the Criminal Defense Attorney & Workers’ Compensation Law Offices of Arechigo & Stokka could help you minimize your financial burden associated with a DWI charge. Call us today at 651-222-6603 to discuss your options.

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What Does TTD Mean in Workers’ Comp?

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When you’re injured on the job, there are lots of details to handle. You need medical treatment, but you also need to figure out how to pay bills. You assume workers’ compensation will help with your income, but how does it work? Workers’ compensation can be complicated, and it’s best to hire an attorney who will look out for your interests. One thing our attorneys at Arechigo & Stokka explain to clients is the difference between temporary and permanent disability.  Types of Workers’ Compensation Workers’ compensation programs use a lot of acronyms, which can be confusing. For instance, What does TTD stand for in workers’ comp? It’s simply a classification of disability. Workers’ compensation insurance labels the category of your disability:  Temporary total disability (TTD),  Temporary partial disability (TPD),  Permanent total disability (PTD), or  Permanent partial disability (PPD). These classifications depend on the extent of your injury and how likely you are to recover, based on a medical professional’s evaluation.  TTD Workers’ Comp In Minnesota So, what does TTD mean in workers’ comp? When workers’ compensation insurance labels you with TTD, it means they think you have a temporary total disability. This means that you can’t work at all now, but they expect you to be able to work in the future. You don’t have to prove that someone was at fault for your injury to get workers’ compensation TTD payments. Even if you were at fault for your workplace accident, you can still file for compensation. Workers’ compensation covers a new injury sustained on the job or an old injury aggravated by a workplace accident. Your injury must relate to an employment activity. How Much Money Is Available? TTD benefits pay two-thirds of your average weekly wage, though there is a minimum and maximum payment you can receive. Your employer’s workers’ compensation insurance will continue to pay you this benefit until you reach maximum medical improvement, meaning you have recovered or further medical treatment won’t help you get any better. At that point, you may be able to qualify for PPD or PTD benefits based on any permanent disability. Workers’ compensation also pays your medical bills and can pay for vocational rehabilitation. This means that if you can’t perform your job because of your injury, workers’ compensation will pay to train you for a new job. How Long Does Workers’ Compensation Pay? You are eligible for TTD payments for up to 130 weeks unless you enter a retraining program, which can extend the time you can receive payments. Workers’ compensation payments stop when any of the following occur: You reach 130 weeks of payment and are not eligible for retraining; You reach maximum medical improvement; You return to work; or You are medically released to return to work but don’t make an effort to do so. TTD workers’ comp is not a long-term solution for paying your bills. The compensation merely pays basic living expenses and medical bills while you are treated for your injuries. Contact a Minnesota Employment Attorney If you need someone to fight for your fair compensation, contact an experienced attorney. At Arechigo & Stokka, our attorneys fight for injured employees. We work to get you maximum compensation and safe job conditions.  Our attorneys have been helping injured employees for decades, and our compassionate, personalized approach can help you too. Contact us for a free consultation where we can discuss your situation and answer questions.

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